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July 23, 2014 | NPR · A number of major airlines have suspended service to and from Tel Aviv as the fighting between Israel and Hamas in Gaza intensifies. That's leaving passengers to find other arrangements.
 
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July 23, 2014 | NPR · The vice president has been traveling the country to learn about the best ways to train workers. He announced the results Tuesday as the president signed a workforce training bill into law.
 
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July 23, 2014 | NPR · Congress is supposed to hold U.S. spy agencies accountable. But as Edward Snowden's disclosures revealed, intelligence officials have not always provided a full or accurate picture.
 

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July 23, 2014 | NPR · The remains of passengers of the downed Malaysia Airlines flight arrived in the Netherlands, on what has been a national day of mourning. Most of those killed in the jet that was brought down over Ukraine were Dutch. Robert Siegel talks with Thomas Erdbrink of The New York Times, who is in the Netherlands.
 
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July 23, 2014 | NPR · Even before the double calamity of its two downed flights, Malaysia Airlines was trying to adapt to momentous shifts in Asia's aviation industry. Now, it faces either bankruptcy or privatization.
 
July 23, 2014 | NPR · An uncontacted Amazonian tribe has ended its isolation in Brazil. Fiona Watson, the field and research director for Survival International, explains why this tribal people left its village.
 

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July 19, 2014 | NPR · NPR's Scott Simon talks with David Herzsenhorn of The New York Times about the latest developments in Ukraine, where a Malaysia Airlines passenger plane was downed on Thursday, killing 298 people.
 

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July 20, 2014 | NPR · NPR's Arun Rath gets the latest from correspondent Corey Flintoff at the site of last week's downing of a Malaysian jetliner in Eastern Ukraine.
 

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Governing

Jul 22, 2014 — Pensions have long enjoyed strong legal protections, but recent bankruptcy cases suggest this might be changing. As a result, cities and states might ask more workers to accept a little less.
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Jul 22, 2014 — From Toledo to Houston, cities are courting Detroit cops, who are seen as battle-tested from routinely dealing with high crime rates — and fed up from years of low pay and cuts in benefits.
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Jul 22, 2014 — Florida Sen. Marco Rubio tells NPR the nation can't "absorb" all migrants fleeing violence and must secure its own border first. He dismissed potential 2016 rival Hillary Clinton as old news.
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Jul 21, 2014 — President Obama has signed an executive order to ban bias against lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender employees among federal contractors.
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Jul 18, 2014 — More than 46,000 inmates can petition for early release starting next year, unless Congress acts soon.
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Jul 18, 2014 — New commissioner of U.S. Customs and Border Protection Gil Kerlikowske talked to Steve Inskeep in his first extended interview on the use of force and controversial shootings by the Border Patrol.
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Jul 17, 2014 — Yes, Republicans plan to use technology to get out voters in the midterms much like President Obama used it in 2012. But he was Sputnik to their planned moon landing, an official said.
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Jul 16, 2014 — A bill to require employers to pay for birth control did not pass a procedural vote in the Senate. The vote may have been held largely to put GOP senators on record on the issue.
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Jul 15, 2014 — Heavy traffic to the FCC's commenting site crashed it on Tuesday. That was the original deadline for the public to weigh in on a controversial Internet proposal. You now have until Friday to comment.
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Jul 15, 2014 — Once in a while, elected officials turn down raises because they think it looks bad if they're also having to cut budgets or raise taxes. Sometimes, though, they're genuinely altruistic.
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