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September 2, 2014 | NPR · At a Labor Day picnic in Milwaukee, the president accused the GOP of blocking economic initiatives. He urged the sympathetic union audience to turn their frustration into political action in November.
 
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September 2, 2014 | NPR · The city's plan to restructure its debt has been praised as a creative way to protect both pensioners and its art museum. But some creditors — and residents — feel like they're being railroaded.
 
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September 2, 2014 | NPR · A company called WTAS is reviving the defunct accounting firm's name and hoping clients have forgotten its associations with the Enron scandal.
 

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September 2, 2014 | NPR · The Islamist extremist group Islamic State has released a new video that purports to show the beheading of an American journalist named Steven Sotloff, whom the group threatened to kill two weeks ago.
 
September 2, 2014 | NPR · In response to unrest in eastern Ukraine, NATO is considering forming a rapid reaction force — a topic that will be discussed at a summit this week in Wales. But how will Russia react, and is this the right move for the alliance? To learn more, Audie Cornish speaks with Steven Pifer, the director of Arms Control and Non-Proliferation Initiative at the Brookings Institution.
 
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September 2, 2014 | NPR · The Pentagon has been transferring mine-resistant, ambush-protected vehicles to local police. Built to protect U.S. forces from roadside bomb blasts at war, these huge vehicles aren't always welcome.
 

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August 30, 2014 | NPR · Ukrainian forces are defending the port city of Novoazovsk from what they say is a Russian invasion. Scott Simon talks to correspondent Soraya Sarhaddi Nelson.
 

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August 31, 2014 | NPR · Immigration remains one of the most challenging issues for President Obama. Political correspondent Mara Liasson discusses the political cost of the choices before him with Linda Wertheimer.
 

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Health

Sep 2, 2014 — A brief video captures the chaos of Ebola in Liberia. A suspected patient, who allegedly fled a treatment center, is pursued by health workers and wrestled into a truck.
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Sep 2, 2014 — Young women diagnosed with breast cancer are increasingly choosing to have both breasts removed. A big study says that doesn't improve their survival odds any more than does less drastic treatments.
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Sep 2, 2014 — He's the third American to contract the disease while working in Liberia. In this case, the doctor, who was part of the Christian aid group SIM, was treating obstetrics patients.
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Sep 2, 2014 — Homes with dirt floors can make people sick. Replacing them with concrete floors helps cut risks but isn't always affordable. A new project in Rwanda relies on a low-cost alternative.
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Sep 2, 2014 — Although some insurance plans are expanding coverage for infertility treatments, most coverage remains skimpy. Shared-risk programs can help couples gain some measure of control.
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Sep 1, 2014 — Ebola has exposed weaknesses in Africa's health networks and a failure to work together to arrest the spread of the virus. The "not our problem" response is taking an economic toll on the continent.
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Sep 1, 2014 — Nearly 260 health workers in West Africa have been infected, and 134 have died. Dr. Robert Garry of Tulane University, who worked with five who died, discusses the devastation in the community.
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Sep 1, 2014 — A new diet study concludes that a low-carbohydrate diet leads to almost three times more weight loss than a traditional low-fat diet where carbs made up 40 to 45 percent of calories.
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Sep 1, 2014 — Some earlier research hinted that Ritalin and Adderall can hamper a child's growth. But a study of adults who took the drugs as kids now suggests any such effect is only temporary.
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Sep 1, 2014 — The medical students were in Iquitos. They could provide much-needed surgery for the residents of this remote Peruvian town. Just one problem: They didn't have enough patients.
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