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August 28, 2014 | NPR · For the first time, researchers have tracked the spread of Ebola, almost in real time, during an outbreak. The virus is quickly changing its genetic code. But it's unclear what the mutations mean.
 
August 29, 2014 | NPR · French President Francois Hollande is under pressure to fix the country's economy, which is overburdened by regulation and failing a generation of young people. He's also facing calls for austerity.
 
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August 29, 2014 | NPR · Congressman and former Republican vice presidential nominee Paul Ryan discusses his new book, The Way Forward: Renewing the American Idea.
 

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August 29, 2014 | NPR · As the Obama administration develops a strategy for fighting the Islamic State in Iraq and Syria, several members of Congress say they want buy-in.
 
August 29, 2014 | NPR · Regular political commentators, E.J. Dionne of The Washington Post and David Brooks of The New York Times, discuss the latest in Ukraine and the actions of ISIS in Iraq and Syria.
 
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August 29, 2014 | NPR · An earthquake in Napa Valley this week brought back old fears for author Gustavo Arellano. In his anxiety he's revisiting the book, A Crack in the Edge of the World.
 

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August 23, 2014 | NPR · Nearly 1,500 people have died in the Ebola outbreak, and more nations in the region are closing their borders. NPR's Scott Simon speaks to Africa correspondent Ofeibea Quist-Arcton about the epidemic.
 

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August 24, 2014 | NPR · In the wake of violent clashes between protesters and police in Ferguson, Mo., President Obama is ordering a review of the federal programs that help local police departments purchase military gear.
 

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Humans

Aug 28, 2014 — Dr. Tim Smith, a visual scientist at the University of London, discusses how our brains perceive what's seen on the big screen. How do we process images, events and stories that we see in the movies?
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Aug 27, 2014 — The ALS Association has raised more than $94 million in recent weeks via its online ice bucket challenge — compared with $2.7 million this time last year. Now what?
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Aug 26, 2014 — Enlisting parents to make sure teens get counseling is a start, but a lot of families need more support, research suggests. Even finding the right therapist can be daunting.
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Aug 26, 2014 — Ebola has a nasty reputation for damaging the body, especially its blood vessels. But when you look at the nitty-gritty details of what happens after a person is infected, a surprising fact surfaces.
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Aug 25, 2014 — Grocers are hoping to entice young consumers and their parents to eat more vegetables by creating kid-focused produce. They're borrowing tactics from the soda and snack industries to win them over.
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Aug 24, 2014 — You look. You gape. You can't believe your eyes. Well, take a peek at this image and ask yourself, 'How did they do this?'
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Aug 22, 2014 — Even just the word Ebola is kind of terrifying. Why? Hollywood has a lot to do with it. But Ebola outbreaks also have all the ingredients for what one psychologist calls the "dread factor."
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Aug 21, 2014 — A new study finds cancer affects even simple, ancient multicellular organisms — which means the disease and the deaths it causes may simply be a part of life.
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Aug 20, 2014 — There's a link between how children draw at age 4 and how well they perform on intelligence tests at age 14, researchers say.
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Aug 19, 2014 — Across the U.S., jails hold many more people with serious mental illness than state hospitals do. San Antonio is reweaving its safety net for the mentally ill — and saving $10 million annually.
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