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April 16, 2014 | NPR · Schoolgirls were kidnapped in Nigeria Tuesday. The suspects are believed to be with a radical group blamed for a bombing Monday. Kelly McEvers talks to Michelle Faul of The Associated Press.
 
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April 16, 2014 | NPR · Fans and foes want to know whether the Affordable Care Act is meeting its goals. But, for good reasons, there are no clear answers yet.
 
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April 16, 2014 | NPR · A year after the Boston Marathon bombing, Heather Abbott has adapted to life with her prostheses, including a blade for running and one that allows her to wear her favorite shoes.
 

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April 15, 2014 | NPR · One year has passed since bombs rocked the finish line of the Boston Marathon. The city honored victims of the tragedy Tuesday with a tribute, including speeches from three of the victims themselves.
 
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April 15, 2014 | WBUR · At last year's Boston Marathon, Carol Downing was just half a mile from the finish line when bombs exploded and injured two of her daughters. This year, she's returning to complete the race.
 
April 15, 2014 | NPR · Each April, the shad come back to the Delaware River to spawn, and thousands of anglers in New Jersey and Pennsylvania eagerly await them. Celebrating their annual return is a local spring tradition.
 

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April 12, 2014 | NPR · As pro-Russia demonstrators continue their tense standoff in Eastern Ukraine, police are conspicuously absent from city streets.
 

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April 13, 2014 | NPR · As the anniversary of last year's marathon bombing approaches, NPR's Rachel Martin speaks with correspondent Carrie Johnson about the investigation and legal wrangling yet to come.
 

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Health Headlines Newsletter

Apr 8, 2014 — Freshening up your mouth with a regular rinse could come with a long-term health hazard. But cancer specialists are far more concerned about tobacco, alcohol and betel nut chewing.
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Apr 9, 2014 — If you know Ciroc and Patron, you may well be listening to a lot of songs that name-check brand-name alcohol. And if you're a teenager, you may be binge drinking a lot more, researchers say.
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Apr 9, 2014 — More and more women are deciding to have double mastectomies when they are diagnosed with breast cancer. TV host Samantha Harris is just the latest. But it's not the right choice for everyone.
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Apr 8, 2014 — Childhood amnesia descends gradually — and later than you might think, researchers say. Many 7-year-olds have robust memories of experiences from when they were 3 or even younger.
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Apr 7, 2014 — It's easy to think that a shaking hand could be a sign of Parkinson's disease. But it's more likely essential tremor, an ailment that's not life-threatening but can become debilitating.
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Oct 14, 2013 — Now that enrollment has opened for coverage under the Affordable Care Act, one of the biggest questions people have is, what's the deadline? It's Dec. 15 if you want coverage to start on Jan. 1. But open enrollment actually runs through March 2014. After that, you'll generally have to wait until next fall.
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Oct 12, 2013 — A review of clinical trials using vitamin D to build bone density in middle-aged women finds that it doesn't help. That may be because those women aren't generally low on calcium and that D helps the body absorb calcium in the gut only if it's seriously lacking. It may do more good in the elderly.
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Oct 11, 2013 — Why is kissing found in practically every culture? A kiss can convey passion, love and, perhaps subconsciously, a veritable catalog of information about the worthiness of a potential mate. So much for romance.
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Oct 10, 2013 — A lack of funding to labs is likely to mean an early death for thousands of mice used in scientific and medical research. The loss of specialty mice, many of which have genes that can cause them to develop versions of human diseases, is especially troubling to scientists — and expensive.
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