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July 29, 2014 | NPR · House and Senate negotiators reached a compromise, $17 billion agreement to improve medical care for veterans. The deal comes in the final week before Congress leaves town for a monthlong recess.
 
July 29, 2014 | NPR · Washington Post reporter Liz Sly tells Renee Montagne that U.S. arms may be flowing to moderate Syrian rebels, but the aid seems to be too little too late to affect the course of the civil war.
 
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July 28, 2014 | NPR · The militant group threatens to kill parents who immunize their children. As a result, polio has come roaring back in Pakistan. Eradication now hinges on whether the country can control the virus.
 

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July 29, 2014 | KERA · After caring for Ebola patients for several months in West Africa, Dr. Kent Brantly noticed last week that he had symptoms. The 33-year-old immediately put himself into a Liberian isolation ward.
 
July 29, 2014 | NPR · Virologist Thomas Geisbert has spent decades studying Ebola and other hemorrhagic fevers. He speaks to Audie Cornish about the current Ebola outbreak, the worst in history, and how it might be contained this time around.
 
July 29, 2014 | NPR · The Eid festival, which celebrates the end of Ramadan, serves as a time for visiting relatives and exchanging gifts. But one family's holiday in Gaza traces the death and displacement wrought by the war between Hamas and Israel.
 

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July 26, 2014 | NPR · Hezbollah has been a longtime ally of Hamas, but during this most recent conflict between Israel and Gaza they've taken a sideline role. NPR's Scott Simon talks to the BBC's Kim Ghattas in Beirut.
 

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July 27, 2014 | NPR · Fighting in Ukraine near the crash site of Malaysia Airlines Flight MH17 has international investigators staying away. NPR's Arun Rath talks with OSCE's Michael Bociurkiw about the investigation.
 

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Solutions

Aug 22, 2008 — Spain is making use of its 300 sunny days per year by powering thousands of homes with Europe's first commercial solar-thermal tower plant and running it doesn't generate any greenhouse gases.
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Apr 27, 2008 — In one of the city's poorest areas, residents who recycle trash by hand and a handful of environmental activists are slowly improving their community. Their efforts serve as an unlikely model for environmental change in an age of global warming.
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Apr 21, 2008 — Dubai will try just about anything; the bolder and more outlandish, the better. So two Dutch architects have opened a business there specializing in homes, offices and hotels that float. They hope their floating architecture will help coastal cities around the world survive climate change.
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Aug 20, 2008 — France has finally settled on a place to put the nuclear waste from all of its power plants, even though the country is still uncomfortable with its dependence on nuclear reactors, which provide 80 percent of the nation's electricity.
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May 6, 2008 — Planners hope to transform an empty stretch of desert into Masdar, a city of 50,000, within a decade. They aim for it to be powered entirely by renewable energy, to reuse water and to recycle even human waste.
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May 5, 2008 — Once it's completed, Masdar City will house 50,000 residents and use only renewable energy. The project in the oil-rich United Arab Emirates, residents say, is driven by future business opportunities and a desire for change.
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May 5, 2008 — In the United Arab Emirates, Abu Dhabi sits on nearly 10 percent of the world's oil reserves. So it may be surprising to hear that climate leaders there have launched a major initiative in sustainability. Masdar, a demonstration city of 50,000 inhabitants, will have a zero carbon footprint.
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May 4, 2008 — A short distance from the new $30 million Al-Azhar Park in Cairo, Egypt, young environmentalists are installing solar hot-water heaters in poor neighborhoods. They're overcoming setbacks — and bridging religious divides — to bring change in a time of environmental upheaval.
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May 4, 2008 — NPR's Science Editor David Malakoff joins Liane Hansen in the studio to reflect not only on the three climate change stories reported from Egypt, but also on NPR's Climate Connections series as a whole.
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Apr 28, 2008 — One Anglican cleric thinks churches can do more to help the Earth, and he's trying to convince ministries around the world to start preaching a change in the way people live.
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