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April 16, 2014 | NPR · Schoolgirls were kidnapped in Nigeria Tuesday. The suspects are believed to be with a radical group blamed for a bombing Monday. Kelly McEvers talks to Michelle Faul of The Associated Press.
 
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April 16, 2014 | NPR · Fans and foes want to know whether the Affordable Care Act is meeting its goals. But, for good reasons, there are no clear answers yet.
 
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April 16, 2014 | NPR · A year after the Boston Marathon bombing, Heather Abbott has adapted to life with her prostheses, including a blade for running and one that allows her to wear her favorite shoes.
 

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April 15, 2014 | NPR · One year has passed since bombs rocked the finish line of the Boston Marathon. The city honored victims of the tragedy Tuesday with a tribute, including speeches from three of the victims themselves.
 
Courtesy of Carol Downing
April 15, 2014 | WBUR · At last year's Boston Marathon, Carol Downing was just half a mile from the finish line when bombs exploded and injured two of her daughters. This year, she's returning to complete the race.
 
April 15, 2014 | NPR · Each April, the shad come back to the Delaware River to spawn, and thousands of anglers in New Jersey and Pennsylvania eagerly await them. Celebrating their annual return is a local spring tradition.
 

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April 12, 2014 | NPR · As pro-Russia demonstrators continue their tense standoff in Eastern Ukraine, police are conspicuously absent from city streets.
 

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April 13, 2014 | NPR · As the anniversary of last year's marathon bombing approaches, NPR's Rachel Martin speaks with correspondent Carrie Johnson about the investigation and legal wrangling yet to come.
 

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ethics

Dec 27, 2013 — Delta Air Lines will honor some incredibly inexpensive tickets it mistakenly sold on Thursday. Some cross-country trips were going for as little as $25. When it's obvious a seller has made a big mistake in your favor, is it OK to buy anyway?
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Oct 2, 2013 — The fear of science run amok has been with us as long as the practice itself. But who decides what are the reasonable ethical boundaries for science? Commentator Marcelo Gleiser grabs ahold of this question and advises that blindly placing constraints on certain types of inquiry will not save us from Pandora's Box. We have to be smarter than that.
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Jan 28, 2013 — NPR's photo blog has started a remarkably considered conversation over the ethics of taking a moving Newtown picture of a woman praying in grief. The woman and the photographer — each sympathetic — weigh in. The blog's debate over trade-offs is worth expanding to a wider public.
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Jan 7, 2013 — What can we learn from philosophers about keeping New Year's resolutions and becoming better people? Commentator Tania Lombrozo considers some clever studies on the relationship between words and deeds.
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Mar 13, 2012 — NPR's new Ethics Handbook, which revises its long-standing News Code of Ethics, powerfully focuses on principles more than rules, acknowledging that much of journalism is judgment. This is the first of several posts exploring the handbook, a "living document" designed to evolve.
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Oct 25, 2011 — Want post a comment about something we're not covering? Here's a space for readers to share their thoughts about media, policy and NPR's journalism.
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Sep 22, 2011 — A bioethicist says Rep. Michele Bachmann was not able to meet his challenge and produce evidence linking the HPV vaccine with mental retardation.
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Jul 23, 2010 — Democrats who breathed a sigh of relief upon seeing the Blagojevich trial come to an unexpected end in Illinois now are nervous about another potential ethics stain on the party: charges leveled against Rep. Charlie Rangel of New York.
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Oct 15, 2009 — New rules encourage NPR's news staff to use popular social media services "for journalistic purposes and as a way to connect with the audience." But journalists also must avoid saying or doing anything online that jeopardizes NPR's credibility.
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