Latest News from NPR

on:

NCPR is supported by:

 
Hourly Newscast
4 min., 45 sec.

Programs

Latest program rundown

Coming up:

Latest Features:
July 29, 2014 | NPR · House and Senate negotiators reached a compromise, $17 billion agreement to improve medical care for veterans. The deal comes in the final week before Congress leaves town for a monthlong recess.
 
July 29, 2014 | NPR · Washington Post reporter Liz Sly tells Renee Montagne that U.S. arms may be flowing to moderate Syrian rebels, but the aid seems to be too little too late to affect the course of the civil war.
 
AFP/Getty Images
July 28, 2014 | NPR · The militant group threatens to kill parents who immunize their children. As a result, polio has come roaring back in Pakistan. Eradication now hinges on whether the country can control the virus.
 

Latest program rundown

Coming up:

Latest Features:
July 28, 2014 | NPR · A new salvo has been fired in the fight over teacher tenure. A group led by former TV anchor Campbell Brown filed a complaint in New York state court, arguing that tenure laws are preventing the state from providing every child with the "sound, basic education" its constitution guarantees.
 
WNYC
July 28, 2014 | NPR · Why are so many low-income and minority kids getting second-class educations in the U.S.? That question is at the center of the heated debate about tenure protections and who gets them.
 
July 28, 2014 | NPR · Only one movie in July, Transformers: Age of Extinction, has broken the 100 million mark during its opening weekend. Box office receipts all summer have proven anemic. Paul Dergarabedian, a senior media analyst with RENTRAK, talks to Audie Cornish about the box office slump.
 

Latest Saturday rundown




WE Saturday Feature

July 26, 2014 | NPR · Hezbollah has been a longtime ally of Hamas, but during this most recent conflict between Israel and Gaza they've taken a sideline role. NPR's Scott Simon talks to the BBC's Kim Ghattas in Beirut.
 

Latest Sunday rundown


WE Sunday Feature

July 27, 2014 | NPR · Fighting in Ukraine near the crash site of Malaysia Airlines Flight MH17 has international investigators staying away. NPR's Arun Rath talks with OSCE's Michael Bociurkiw about the investigation.
 

Latest program rundown

Coming up:

Facebook

Jul 29, 2014 — The White House says the cost of inaction outweighs the cost of implementing more stringent regulations on greenhouse gas emissions.
Comments |
Jul 29, 2014 — Also: The U.S. seizes imported oil in an Iraqi dispute; Time Warner wants arbitration to settle a dispute over TV rights; and there's a new print font honoring late Venezuelan leader Hugo Chavez.
Comments |
Jul 29, 2014 — Once again, an unarmed black man has died in a confrontation with police. This time the clash was captured on video. You'd think that might make everything clearer. You'd be wrong.
Comments |
Jul 29, 2014 — Cacao "supertrees" in the north produce more pods with more seeds than ordinary cacao trees. A USAID project hopes to capitalize on that so Haiti can gain a foothold in the high-end chocolate market.
Comments |
Jul 29, 2014 — It's hard not to worry about heart problems when running hard in hot weather. But heat stroke is a far bigger health risk, researchers say. Marathon organizers are trying to make races safer.
Comments |
Jul 29, 2014 — Former security czar Zhou Yongkang is accused of "serious disciplinary violation," which often implies that criminal corruption charges will follow.
Comments |
Jul 29, 2014 — Also: Linda Gregerson has a new poem in The New Yorker; allegations of sexual harassment at the country's biggest comic book convention.
Comments |
Jul 29, 2014 — Benjamin Netanyahu called the operation in Gaza justified and asked Israeli citizens to prepare for a long conflict.
Comments |
Jul 29, 2014 — A clerk in Concord recently refused to sell liquor to a resident of the nation's capital because state law says licenses from other states can be used to buy booze, and Washington isn't a state.
Launch in player | Comments |
Jul 29, 2014 — For centuries, Shiites, Sunnis and Kurds had coexisted in Mosul, but some fear ruptures there may be harbingers of the partition of Iraq. If that happens, Ahmed Ali may never see his farm again.
Launch in player | Comments |
more Facebook from NPR