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July 30, 2014 | KQED · Adding a translation to the English label would require bigger bottles, pharmacists say. They worry patients would wind up carrying a few pills around loose — without any instructions at all.
 
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July 30, 2014 | WNYC · In the past 20 years, New Jersey went from having more than 20 percent of U.S. pharmaceutical manufacturing jobs to less than 10 percent. That means offices, labs and warehouses have gone dark.
 
July 30, 2014 | NPR · Sheik Humarr Khan, one of the doctors fighting to control West Africa's largest Ebola outbreak, died Tuesday in Sierra Leone. He was 39.
 

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July 29, 2014 | KERA · After caring for Ebola patients for several months in West Africa, Dr. Kent Brantly noticed last week that he had symptoms. The 33-year-old immediately put himself into a Liberian isolation ward.
 
July 29, 2014 | NPR · Virologist Thomas Geisbert has spent decades studying Ebola and other hemorrhagic fevers. He speaks to Audie Cornish about the current Ebola outbreak, the worst in history, and how it might be contained this time around.
 
July 29, 2014 | NPR · The Eid festival, which celebrates the end of Ramadan, serves as a time for visiting relatives and exchanging gifts. But one family's holiday in Gaza traces the death and displacement wrought by the war between Hamas and Israel.
 

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July 26, 2014 | NPR · Hezbollah has been a longtime ally of Hamas, but during this most recent conflict between Israel and Gaza they've taken a sideline role. NPR's Scott Simon talks to the BBC's Kim Ghattas in Beirut.
 

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July 27, 2014 | NPR · Fighting in Ukraine near the crash site of Malaysia Airlines Flight MH17 has international investigators staying away. NPR's Arun Rath talks with OSCE's Michael Bociurkiw about the investigation.
 

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technology

May 13, 2014 — A young engineer working on an Army project to help stabilize weapons realized the technology could also help some Parkinson's patients with essential tasks.
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Apr 21, 2014 — When adults are absorbed in their mobile devices, the consequences for children are not good. Research shows kids act out more if they are competing with a mobile device for their parent's attention.
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Apr 21, 2014 — In ancient times scribes were used to record everything from prayers to legal transactions. Now they're making a comeback in the doctor's office, easing the transition to electronic medical records.
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Mar 21, 2014 — Satellites have focused the search for Malaysia Airlines Flight 370 on the southern Indian Ocean. But without results yet, the effort also highlights the technology's limitations.
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Feb 25, 2014 — You are living in an age of wonders, says commentator Adam Frank. Every day we take part in activities that once seemed like the realm of science fiction. So why are you so dissatisfied?
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Feb 19, 2014 — WhatsApp makes a text messaging app that works on all major smartphone operating systems. Founded in Silicon Valley less than five years ago, the company has 55 employees.
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Feb 10, 2014 — For decades, doctors have transported donor organs chilled on ice in a plain old cooler. But a company is trying to come up with a better way to carry the lifesaving organs. The experimental machines keep hearts beating and lungs moving outside the body.
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Jan 27, 2014 — Alarms are good and necessary things in hospital care — except when there are so many that caregivers miss signals of a patient in crisis. Trying to conquer "alarm fatigue," one hospital turned off the beeps — and found that patient care actually improved.
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Jan 14, 2014 — Pizza printed up for dinner? Or how about an edible photograph for your next birthday cake? The first restaurant-grade approved 3-D printer was unveiled last week, and the gadget can churn out candies in any shape imaginable. Other printers in the works make custom-shaped pastas and assemble ravioli and gnocchi.
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Jan 3, 2014 — So the world's most clandestine spy agency is working on something called a quantum computer. It's based on rules Einstein himself described as "spooky," and it can crack almost any code. That's got to be top-secret stuff, right? Guess again.
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