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April 15, 2014 | NPR · The acting Ukrainian president says his military is advancing against pro-Russian separatists who took over government buildings in eastern Ukraine. The separatists didn't comply with an ultimatum.
 
April 15, 2014 | NPR · As part of NPR's anniversary coverage of the Boston Marathon bombing, Morning Edition co-host David Greene talks to Mass. Gov. Deval Patrick about that day.
 
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April 15, 2014 | NPR · The bloody 1989 crackdown in Beijing changed China, NPR's Louisa Lim explains in a new book. She also chronicles the brutal repression that took place in another city — and remained hidden until now.
 

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April 15, 2014 | NPR · One year has passed since bombs rocked the finish line of the Boston Marathon. The city honored victims of the tragedy Tuesday with a tribute, including speeches from three of the victims themselves.
 
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April 15, 2014 | WBUR · At last year's Boston Marathon, Carol Downing was just half a mile from the finish line when bombs exploded and injured two of her daughters. This year, she's returning to complete the race.
 
April 15, 2014 | NPR · Each April, the shad come back to the Delaware River to spawn, and thousands of anglers in New Jersey and Pennsylvania eagerly await them. Celebrating their annual return is a local spring tradition.
 

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April 12, 2014 | NPR · As pro-Russia demonstrators continue their tense standoff in Eastern Ukraine, police are conspicuously absent from city streets.
 

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April 13, 2014 | NPR · As the anniversary of last year's marathon bombing approaches, NPR's Rachel Martin speaks with correspondent Carrie Johnson about the investigation and legal wrangling yet to come.
 

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World War II

Feb 7, 2014 — The 2,000-pound bomb was too big to explode in place — usually the safest option. Instead, it had to be dismantled after some 2,200 residents were evacuated from surrounding apartment buildings.
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Jan 17, 2014 — For nearly three decades, until 1974, Lt. Hiroo Onoda lived in a Philippine jungle. During those years he continued to battle with villagers. As many as 30 people were killed. It wasn't until his former commander ordered Onoda to lay down his arms that he surrendered. Onoda died Thursday. He was 91.
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Dec 23, 2013 — The British mathematician, also considered the father of modern computing, committed suicide in 1954 after being convicted of "gross indecency" with another man.
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Dec 4, 2013 — The I-400, the prototype of an aircraft-carrying submarine meant to be used in stealthy airstrikes against U.S. cities, was located in August near Oahu.
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Nov 16, 2013 — The latest film from Oscar-winning Japanese animator Hayao Miyazaki tells the story the engineer who designed the Mitsubishi Zero, the fighter plane used in attacks on Pearl Harbor. The Wind Rises is drawing sharp criticism from around Asia, where the wounds of World War II have yet to heal.
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Aug 21, 2013 — In 1945, a hungry American prisoner of war in Germany traded a much-loved ring for some food. Nearly 70 years later, it has found its way to the man's family. How it got there is a good story.
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Jun 10, 2013 — Shot down during the Battle of Britain more than 70 years ago, the rare Dornier 17 bomber was salvaged from the murky depths of the English Channel Monday.
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May 4, 2013 — It's been 70 years since the letters of John Pryor were understood in their full meaning. That's because as a British prisoner of war in Nazi Germany, Pryor's letters home to his family also included intricate codes that were recently deciphered by codebreakers for the first time since the 1940s.
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Oct 22, 2012 — The Nazi concentration camp was "worse than Dante's hell," Antoni Dobrowolski said in an 2009 interview. He was sent there for teaching young Poles. Nazi Germany, which invaded Poland in 1939, had tried to outlaw education beyond elementary age.
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Jul 13, 2012 — When the Red Cross began charging soldiers for snacks during World War II, it learned a painful lesson in the economics of free stuff.
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