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April 18, 2014 | NPR · The agreement calls on all parties to refrain from violence, requires that illegally-armed groups disarm and that control of government buildings be returned to Ukrainian authorities.
 
April 18, 2014 | NPR · President Obama said enrollment under the Affordable Care Act reached 8 million after the deadline was extended by 2 weeks. The figure represents a turnaround from the disastrous debut of the website.
 
April 18, 2014 | NPR · Morning Edition spent a lot of time recently reporting from the U.S.-Mexico border. President Obama has deported 2 million people from the U.S. But many say that number is misleading.
 

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April 18, 2014 | NPR · It looks as though the "comment period" for the controversial Keystone XL pipeline project will be extended, delaying a decision past the November elections.
 
April 18, 2014 | NPR · Regular political commentators, E.J. Dionne of The Washington Post and David Brooks of The New York Times, discuss the breakthrough Ukraine deal and the new health care enrollment numbers.
 
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April 18, 2014 | NPR · Ivan Soltesz studies epilepsy in mice, but says children with chronic seizures are his inspiration. He's closing in on a way to quell the seizures with light — and without drugs' side effects.
 

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April 12, 2014 | NPR · As pro-Russia demonstrators continue their tense standoff in Eastern Ukraine, police are conspicuously absent from city streets.
 

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April 13, 2014 | NPR · As the anniversary of last year's marathon bombing approaches, NPR's Rachel Martin speaks with correspondent Carrie Johnson about the investigation and legal wrangling yet to come.
 

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Privacy

Apr 14, 2014 — What does the data you generate every day reveal about who you are? Commentator Tania Lombrozo wonders where to draw the line between reasonable inferences and violations of privacy.
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Mar 3, 2014 — Even staunch privacy advocates are concluding that it's impossible to protect personal data completely. The best hope for online privacy, they say, lies in legal safeguards that prevent abuse.
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Jan 27, 2014 — While the agreement gives tech companies more options in publishing data about government requests for information, it also includes several limitations. It's part of President Obama's plan to change how U.S. intelligence agencies handle personal data.
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Jan 23, 2014 — An independent panel created after the 9/11 attacks says bulk collection of billions of American phone records violates the letter and the spirit of the law.
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Jan 16, 2014 — A presentation slide cited by The Guardian is subtitled "SMS Text Messages: A Goldmine to Exploit." The top secret Dishfire text-collection program was reportedly both global and arbitrary.
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Jan 13, 2014 — Lawyers for a young Portland man convicted of trying to blow up a Christmas tree ceremony are asking a judge to order the Justice Department to open its files and share "facts and circumstances" of electronic surveillance that prosecutors disclosed only months after his conviction.
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Jan 13, 2014 — Feeling "watched" by secret Internet agents hoping to sell you new shoes can be disturbing. But commentator Tania Lombrozo suggests that it isn't this loss of privacy, per se, that makes personalized Internet advertising distinctly unnerving.
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Dec 31, 2013 — Japan's tough new law protecting state secrets was a victory for Washington, which had long pressured its Asian ally to exert tighter control over classified information. But the controversial law has triggered widespread outrage in Japan and undermined the popularity of Prime Minister Shinzo Abe.
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Dec 25, 2013 — In a short addressed televised on Britain's Channel 4, former NSA contractor Edward Snowden said, "A child born today will grow up with no conception of privacy at all."
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Nov 4, 2013 — Scientists are asking people to contribute samples of their gut microbes to help figure out how those microbes affect human health. But ethicists say sharing that information, as well as the personal health data that make it useful to researchers, poses risks. That's especially true for children.
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