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July 29, 2014 | NPR · House and Senate negotiators reached a compromise, $17 billion agreement to improve medical care for veterans. The deal comes in the final week before Congress leaves town for a monthlong recess.
 
July 29, 2014 | NPR · Washington Post reporter Liz Sly tells Renee Montagne that U.S. arms may be flowing to moderate Syrian rebels, but the aid seems to be too little too late to affect the course of the civil war.
 
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July 28, 2014 | NPR · The militant group threatens to kill parents who immunize their children. As a result, polio has come roaring back in Pakistan. Eradication now hinges on whether the country can control the virus.
 

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July 29, 2014 | KERA · After caring for Ebola patients for several months in West Africa, Dr. Kent Brantly noticed last week that he had symptoms. The 33-year-old immediately put himself into a Liberian isolation ward.
 
July 29, 2014 | NPR · Virologist Thomas Geisbert has spent decades studying Ebola and other hemorrhagic fevers. He speaks to Audie Cornish about the current Ebola outbreak, the worst in history, and how it might be contained this time around.
 
July 29, 2014 | NPR · The Eid festival, which celebrates the end of Ramadan, serves as a time for visiting relatives and exchanging gifts. But one family's holiday in Gaza traces the death and displacement wrought by the war between Hamas and Israel.
 

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July 26, 2014 | NPR · Hezbollah has been a longtime ally of Hamas, but during this most recent conflict between Israel and Gaza they've taken a sideline role. NPR's Scott Simon talks to the BBC's Kim Ghattas in Beirut.
 

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July 27, 2014 | NPR · Fighting in Ukraine near the crash site of Malaysia Airlines Flight MH17 has international investigators staying away. NPR's Arun Rath talks with OSCE's Michael Bociurkiw about the investigation.
 

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Cancer

Jun 30, 2014 — The American College of Physicians says annual pelvic exams aren't necessary for healthy women and could be harmful. But not all doctors agree, and the new recommendation is stirring up debate.
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Jun 26, 2014 — Drinking too much alcohol is a big factor in deaths of adults under age 65, CDC researchers say, from obvious risks like vehicle accidents to more subtle effects like higher rates of breast cancer.
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Jun 21, 2014 — A sulfur compound in garlic can linger in the body for up to two days, stinking up your breath, sweat and pee. Milk, parsley or citrus might help break it down more quickly or mask the stench.
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Jun 18, 2014 — A study found that people who consumed broccoli sprouts excreted two air pollutants faster than usual. So does that mean there's something to detoxing with cruciferous veggies? Scientists say maybe.
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Jun 13, 2014 — We asked teenagers and young adults if the movie gets close to the reality of living through cancer. They said the loneliness, yes. The Hollywood hair, not so much.
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Jun 1, 2014 — The annual meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology features thousands of presentations but no big news. That's how cancer treatment improves, in small increments.
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May 21, 2014 — More than two-thirds of women who had a double mastectomy after a cancer diagnosis didn't have the high risk that could be reduced by the surgery, a study finds.
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May 21, 2014 — The recent FDA approval of an HPV test to screen for cervical cancer has ignited debate among doctors. Some say the viral test will catch cancers earlier. Others warn it increases needless biopsies.
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May 12, 2014 — Cervical cancer screening often isn't recommended for women after age 65, but that may be when they're most vulnerable, a study finds. African-American women face a particularly high risk.
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May 7, 2014 — Noah Shaw was diagnosed with a potentially fatal cancer when he was just 4 months old. That didn't shake his father's faith in God. But it did drive him to try to invent an early cancer test.
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