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April 18, 2014 | NPR · The agreement calls on all parties to refrain from violence, requires that illegally-armed groups disarm and that control of government buildings be returned to Ukrainian authorities.
 
April 18, 2014 | NPR · President Obama said enrollment under the Affordable Care Act reached 8 million after the deadline was extended by 2 weeks. The figure represents a turnaround from the disastrous debut of the website.
 
April 18, 2014 | NPR · Morning Edition spent a lot of time recently reporting from the U.S.-Mexico border. President Obama has deported 2 million people from the U.S. But many say that number is misleading.
 

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April 18, 2014 | NPR · It looks as though the "comment period" for the controversial Keystone XL pipeline project will be extended, delaying a decision past the November elections.
 
April 18, 2014 | NPR · Regular political commentators, E.J. Dionne of The Washington Post and David Brooks of The New York Times, discuss the breakthrough Ukraine deal and the new health care enrollment numbers.
 
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April 18, 2014 | NPR · Ivan Soltesz studies epilepsy in mice, but says children with chronic seizures are his inspiration. He's closing in on a way to quell the seizures with light — and without drugs' side effects.
 

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April 12, 2014 | NPR · As pro-Russia demonstrators continue their tense standoff in Eastern Ukraine, police are conspicuously absent from city streets.
 

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April 13, 2014 | NPR · As the anniversary of last year's marathon bombing approaches, NPR's Rachel Martin speaks with correspondent Carrie Johnson about the investigation and legal wrangling yet to come.
 

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Medical Devices

Apr 18, 2014 — Ivan Soltesz studies epilepsy in mice, but says children with chronic seizures are his inspiration. He's closing in on a way to quell the seizures with light — and without drugs' side effects.
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Mar 13, 2014 — The battery-powered device sends electrical pulses through the skin of the forehead. People who used the headband in a study had fewer migraines and took less headache medicine.
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Feb 14, 2014 — The former head of a prestigious Boston hospital found it unsettling when the surgical staff of an Illinois academic medical center endorsed a medical device in a national newspaper advertisement. After he started asking questions, the hospital asked that the ad, paid for by the device maker, be suspended.
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Feb 10, 2014 — For decades, doctors have transported donor organs chilled on ice in a plain old cooler. But a company is trying to come up with a better way to carry the lifesaving organs. The experimental machines keep hearts beating and lungs moving outside the body.
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Jan 6, 2014 — Medicare spends about $20 billion each year on implanted medical devices. Nearly half of the total goes for orthopedic surgery. Yet doctors who were surveyed about implant prices could only accurately estimate the prices about one-fifth of the time.
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Nov 29, 2013 — With babies getting bigger and moms' pelvises getting smaller, it's no wonder moms have problems in delivery these days. Inventors have come up with all kinds of devices to help babies into the world. Some seem promising, but others are a little far-fetched.
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Nov 28, 2013 — For a class project, three engineering students at Rice University devised an inexpensive robotic arm to help a teenager with an uncommon bone disease. The work took two years to complete, far longer than the class that was its starting point.
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Nov 21, 2013 — What would it take for people to like using condoms? Inventors say it's all about the fit and feel. The 11 winners in a competition sponsored by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation include one condom made from beef tendons, and another that's heat-activated for a glove-like fit.
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Nov 16, 2013 — The Food and Drug Administration approved a pacemaker-like device for patients whose epilepsy can't be controlled with drugs. The device senses when seizures are coming and stops them by sending electronic signals through wires inserted deep in the brain.
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Oct 25, 2013 — The chemicals used in some 3-D printers can be toxic to humans. So researchers are looking to use naturally occurring vitamin B2 instead. They have already been able to make intricate, microscopic structures with the vitamin-rich material.
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