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August 28, 2014 | NPR · James Tomsheck was pushed out of his job as internal affairs chief for Customs and Border Protection in June. He warns the agency has become a paramilitary organization with little accountability.
 
August 28, 2014 | NPR · U.S. and Russian experts recently met on neutral territory, on an island in Finland, to try to work through issues that have been building up ever since Vladimir Putin returned to the Kremlin.
 
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August 28, 2014 | NPR · Foster Farms has been accused of poisoning its customers with salmonella bacteria. But in recent months, the company has become a leader in the poultry industry's fight against the foodborne pathogen.
 

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August 28, 2014 | NPR · The pay is generous — $1,000 a month. The risks are enormous. They collect the body of an Ebola victim, avoiding any contact that could infect them. They wear safety garb. And they pray.
 
August 28, 2014 | NPR · The Syrian civil war has flared up in the south of the country, near the Israeli border. A group of Islamist fighters have now captured a border crossing between Syria and Israel on the Golan Heights.
 
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August 28, 2014 | NPR · The protests following Michael Brown's death have rekindled long-standing complaints about racist policing in the St. Louis area. Cops there are now becoming more outspoken in their own defense.
 

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August 23, 2014 | NPR · Nearly 1,500 people have died in the Ebola outbreak, and more nations in the region are closing their borders. NPR's Scott Simon speaks to Africa correspondent Ofeibea Quist-Arcton about the epidemic.
 

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August 24, 2014 | NPR · In the wake of violent clashes between protesters and police in Ferguson, Mo., President Obama is ordering a review of the federal programs that help local police departments purchase military gear.
 

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Medical Devices

Aug 27, 2014 — You think bringing a new toothbrush to market is easy? The seven-year saga of two dental entrepreneurs struggling to bring their patented brush to consumers suggests otherwise.
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Jun 27, 2014 — Hospital-acquired infections with Staphylococcus aureus are a major health problem. Learning how staph can gum up tiny tubes like catheters may help prevent infections.
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Jun 18, 2014Fresh Air tech contributor Alexis Madrigal explains how a tiny computer attaches to a pill you ingest to record how your body responds. It sounds crazy, he says, but it was approved by the FDA.
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Jun 16, 2014 — Strokes come in two varieties, and drugs that treat one type can be deadly for the other. An experimental device could help get the right treatment to patients while they're still in ambulances.
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Jun 16, 2014 — Insulin monitors and pumps are getting better, but a person with diabetes will tell you they're far from ideal. Potential solutions include one that delivers two hormones to control blood sugar.
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Apr 18, 2014 — Ivan Soltesz studies epilepsy in mice, but says children with chronic seizures are his inspiration. He's closing in on a way to quell the seizures with light — and without drugs' side effects.
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Mar 13, 2014 — The battery-powered device sends electrical pulses through the skin of the forehead. People who used the headband in a study had fewer migraines and took less headache medicine.
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Feb 14, 2014 — The former head of a prestigious Boston hospital found it unsettling when the surgical staff of an Illinois academic medical center endorsed a medical device in a national newspaper advertisement. After he started asking questions, the hospital asked that the ad, paid for by the device maker, be suspended.
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Feb 10, 2014 — For decades, doctors have transported donor organs chilled on ice in a plain old cooler. But a company is trying to come up with a better way to carry the lifesaving organs. The experimental machines keep hearts beating and lungs moving outside the body.
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Jan 6, 2014 — Medicare spends about $20 billion each year on implanted medical devices. Nearly half of the total goes for orthopedic surgery. Yet doctors who were surveyed about implant prices could only accurately estimate the prices about one-fifth of the time.
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