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August 20, 2014 | NPR · If you venture away from the protest zone in Ferguson, Mo., there is an idyllic neighborhood, which doesn't have much patience for the out-of-towners who have joined the protests.
 
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August 20, 2014 | NPR · President Obama has carefully avoided taking sides following the shooting of Missouri teen Michael Brown, disappointing some African-American observers.
 
August 20, 2014 | NPR · Texas ranks 49th out of 50 states in how much funding it commits to mental health. But San Antonio has become a model for other mental health systems. It has saved $50 million over the past 5 years.
 

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Courtesy of Doctors Without Borders
August 19, 2014 | NPR · Dr. Joanne Liu of Doctors Without Borders says fear and a lack of sense of urgency has kept the international community in their home countries rather than stepping up to the plate in West Africa.
 
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August 19, 2014 | NPR · The type of Ebola erupting in West Africa is closely related to one found 2,500 miles away — the distance between Boston and San Francisco. How did the virus spread so far without anyone noticing?
 
August 19, 2014 | NPR · Iranian poet and women's rights advocate Simin Behbahani has died. Her work probed the social and political challenges that faced Iran after its Islamic Revolution. She was 87.
 

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August 16, 2014 | NPR · Both Ukraine and Russia say they're trying to send supplies to residents in eastern Ukraine. But with tensions on both sides running high, that aid may take a while to arrive.
 

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August 17, 2014 | NPR · American fighter jets and drones carried out airstrikes against Islamist targets near the Mosul Dam in northern Iraq on Saturday. A breach of the dam could threaten entire cities.
 

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Disabilities

Aug 4, 2014 — Since the hormone oxytocin makes people more social, it's easy to imagine it might cause the social deficits of autism. But a study found children with autism no more likely to be short of oxytocin.
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Jul 17, 2014 — Sierra Sandison couldn't imagine how she would hide an insulin pump during beauty pageants. So she decided to show it off for the Miss Idaho pageant. She won. Type 1 diabetics say they won, too.
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Jul 5, 2014 — Judy and James Lee's lives revolve around providing 24-hour care to their 16-year-old son. As they get older, they worry about who will eventually take care of him.
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May 17, 2014 — Nearly 20 percent of Americans have physical or mental disabilities, yet only a small fraction of medical schools teach students how to talk with disabled patients about their needs.
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Mar 31, 2014 — An injured leg can cause so much pain that some wounded veterans consider amputation. A brace invented at an Army medical center in Texas is getting them up and running again.
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Feb 14, 2014 — People with dyslexia take longer to alternate their attention between visual and audio cues, researchers say. That's particularly true if they have to attend to a sound after seeing something. That difference may provide clues to better treatments for dyslexia.
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Feb 5, 2014 — Many scientists have been trying to create neural implants that will let amputees regain a sense of touch and control. One version has let a Danish man feel the texture of things he's touching. But it's an experimental model that's not yet ready for use outside the laboratory.
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Jan 30, 2014 — The Institute of Medicine is reviewing how chronic fatigue syndrome is diagnosed. But some patients and doctors say the one of the biggest problems is the name itself. The hallmark symptom is not fatigue, they say, but a physical and mental crash after even mild exercise.
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Jan 14, 2014 — Health plans of all kinds typically cover rehabilitative services, such as physical therapy to help people after an accident or illness. But before the Affordable Care Act passed, coverage of similar services to help people learn or maintain functional skills, rather than regain them, was often excluded.
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Nov 28, 2013 — For a class project, three engineering students at Rice University devised an inexpensive robotic arm to help a teenager with an uncommon bone disease.
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