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April 17, 2014 | NPR · Scientists and food activists are launching a campaign to promote seeds that can be freely shared, rather than protected through patents and licenses. They call it the Open Source Seed Initiative.
 
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April 17, 2014 | NPR · A typical UPS truck now has hundreds of sensors on it. That's changing the way UPS drivers work — and it foreshadows changes coming for workers throughout the economy.
 
April 17, 2014 | NPR · Brazil is the spiritual home of soccer and a world powerhouse in the sport. It's woven into the Brazilian psyche. Wins and losses have had repercussions in other realms — including politics.
 

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April 16, 2014 | NPR · Ukrainian tanks arrived in the city of Kramatorsk Wednesday morning. By the time they rolled out of the city, they were flying Russian flags. People in Kramatorsk tell the story of what happened.
 
April 16, 2014 | NPR · NATO has announced a strengthening of its forces near the alliance's eastern border. Gen. George Joulwan, the former NATO supreme allied commander for Europe, discusses the plan.
 
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April 16, 2014 | NPR · A 325 million-year-old fossil find shows that the gill structures of modern sharks are actually quite different from their ancient ancestors.
 

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April 12, 2014 | NPR · As pro-Russia demonstrators continue their tense standoff in Eastern Ukraine, police are conspicuously absent from city streets.
 

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April 13, 2014 | NPR · As the anniversary of last year's marathon bombing approaches, NPR's Rachel Martin speaks with correspondent Carrie Johnson about the investigation and legal wrangling yet to come.
 

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Disabilities

Mar 31, 2014 — An injured leg can cause so much pain that some wounded veterans consider amputation. A brace invented at an Army medical center in Texas is getting them up and running again.
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Feb 14, 2014 — People with dyslexia take longer to alternate their attention between visual and audio cues, researchers say. That's particularly true if they have to attend to a sound after seeing something. That difference may provide clues to better treatments for dyslexia.
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Feb 5, 2014 — Many scientists have been trying to create neural implants that will let amputees regain a sense of touch and control. One version has let a Danish man feel the texture of things he's touching. But it's an experimental model that's not yet ready for use outside the laboratory.
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Jan 30, 2014 — The Institute of Medicine is reviewing how chronic fatigue syndrome is diagnosed. But some patients and doctors say the one of the biggest problems is the name itself. The hallmark symptom is not fatigue, they say, but a physical and mental crash after even mild exercise.
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Jan 14, 2014 — Health plans of all kinds typically cover rehabilitative services, such as physical therapy to help people after an accident or illness. But before the Affordable Care Act passed, coverage of similar services to help people learn or maintain functional skills, rather than regain them, was often excluded.
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Nov 28, 2013 — For a class project, three engineering students at Rice University devised an inexpensive robotic arm to help a teenager with an uncommon bone disease. The work took two years to complete, far longer than the class that was its starting point.
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Oct 9, 2013 — Doctors know who's had a stroke, but they often know a lot less about those people's quality of life afterward. A study of the long-term effects finds that even people with very mild strokes report declines in their quality of life. Anxiety about another stroke and the need for ongoing medical care are two factors.
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Aug 27, 2013 — Many stroke patients are getting treatment with a drug that dissolves blood clots. The approach was once controversial. But giving the drug to eligible patients within a few hours of a stroke's first symptoms can prevent disability.
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Feb 20, 2013 — 3-D printing can be used to make food, guns and maybe human ears. Researchers say that using collagen to print out ear cartilage solves a lot of the problems in making new ears for people with birth defects or injuries.
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Feb 5, 2013 — Many long-term care policies sold 30 years ago didn't specifically cover assisted living facilities. Policyholders rely on clauses that say new kinds of care will be covered when it becomes available, but the ultimate decision rests with insurers.
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