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July 29, 2014 | NPR · House and Senate negotiators reached a compromise, $17 billion agreement to improve medical care for veterans. The deal comes in the final week before Congress leaves town for a monthlong recess.
 
July 29, 2014 | NPR · Washington Post reporter Liz Sly tells Renee Montagne that U.S. arms may be flowing to moderate Syrian rebels, but the aid seems to be too little too late to affect the course of the civil war.
 
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July 28, 2014 | NPR · The militant group threatens to kill parents who immunize their children. As a result, polio has come roaring back in Pakistan. Eradication now hinges on whether the country can control the virus.
 

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July 28, 2014 | NPR · A new salvo has been fired in the fight over teacher tenure. A group led by former TV anchor Campbell Brown filed a complaint in New York state court, arguing that tenure laws are preventing the state from providing every child with the "sound, basic education" its constitution guarantees.
 
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July 28, 2014 | NPR · Why are so many low-income and minority kids getting second-class educations in the U.S.? That question is at the center of the heated debate about tenure protections and who gets them.
 
July 28, 2014 | NPR · Only one movie in July, Transformers: Age of Extinction, has broken the 100 million mark during its opening weekend. Box office receipts all summer have proven anemic. Paul Dergarabedian, a senior media analyst with RENTRAK, talks to Audie Cornish about the box office slump.
 

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July 26, 2014 | NPR · Hezbollah has been a longtime ally of Hamas, but during this most recent conflict between Israel and Gaza they've taken a sideline role. NPR's Scott Simon talks to the BBC's Kim Ghattas in Beirut.
 

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July 27, 2014 | NPR · Fighting in Ukraine near the crash site of Malaysia Airlines Flight MH17 has international investigators staying away. NPR's Arun Rath talks with OSCE's Michael Bociurkiw about the investigation.
 

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Indiana

Jul 12, 2014 — The state says it will appeal to the U.S. Supreme Court to halt a federal appeals court order that it provide spousal benefits.
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Jun 27, 2014 — The appeals court decision puts a halt to gay marriages in the state pending an appeal of the lower court ruling.
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Jun 25, 2014 — In Indiana, a judge said that same-sex couples are "in all respects like the family down the street. The Constitution demands that we treat them as such."
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Apr 3, 2014 — The collection of items has "immeasurable" cultural value, the FBI says. Some artifacts are Native American; others are Russian and Chinese. It's unclear how many were collected legally.
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Mar 24, 2014 — Forty-five states have adopted the set of standards governing grade-school education. The standards have unleashed political fights that blur party lines.
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Jan 24, 2014 — More than 20 others were injured in the massive accident along a snowy stretch of Interstate 94 about 60 miles east of Chicago.
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Nov 5, 2012 — A possible merger of local governments in Indiana faces trouble on Tuesday's ballot. Despite promises that a combined government would bring costs down, residents worry that their taxes could go up even as the quality of services declines.
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Oct 24, 2012 — Republican Richard Mourdock, who is running for Senate, ignited controversy with his explanation for why he opposes abortion in the case of rape.
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Oct 10, 2012 — U.S. Senate candidate Joe Donnelly holds a slim polling lead over Republican Richard Mourdock in a state no one expected to go Democratic this year. The question is whether GOP voters who have been reluctant to support Mourdock — who knocked out six-term Sen. Richard Lugar in the primary — will come home in the end
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Feb 6, 2012 — Indiana Secretary of State Charlie White was accused of lying about his home address on voter registration forms in order to continue receiving a stipend for serving on his town's council.
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