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July 29, 2014 | NPR · House and Senate negotiators reached a compromise, $17 billion agreement to improve medical care for veterans. The deal comes in the final week before Congress leaves town for a monthlong recess.
 
July 29, 2014 | NPR · Washington Post reporter Liz Sly tells Renee Montagne that U.S. arms may be flowing to moderate Syrian rebels, but the aid seems to be too little too late to affect the course of the civil war.
 
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July 28, 2014 | NPR · The militant group threatens to kill parents who immunize their children. As a result, polio has come roaring back in Pakistan. Eradication now hinges on whether the country can control the virus.
 

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July 28, 2014 | NPR · A new salvo has been fired in the fight over teacher tenure. A group led by former TV anchor Campbell Brown filed a complaint in New York state court, arguing that tenure laws are preventing the state from providing every child with the "sound, basic education" its constitution guarantees.
 
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July 28, 2014 | NPR · Why are so many low-income and minority kids getting second-class educations in the U.S.? That question is at the center of the heated debate about tenure protections and who gets them.
 
July 28, 2014 | NPR · Only one movie in July, Transformers: Age of Extinction, has broken the 100 million mark during its opening weekend. Box office receipts all summer have proven anemic. Paul Dergarabedian, a senior media analyst with RENTRAK, talks to Audie Cornish about the box office slump.
 

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July 26, 2014 | NPR · Hezbollah has been a longtime ally of Hamas, but during this most recent conflict between Israel and Gaza they've taken a sideline role. NPR's Scott Simon talks to the BBC's Kim Ghattas in Beirut.
 

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July 27, 2014 | NPR · Fighting in Ukraine near the crash site of Malaysia Airlines Flight MH17 has international investigators staying away. NPR's Arun Rath talks with OSCE's Michael Bociurkiw about the investigation.
 

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History

Jul 20, 2014 — Market theory does not fully explain the economic choices we make. Commentator Wim Hordijk says we must also look to behavioral economics and evolutionary psychology to understand the economy.
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Jul 13, 2014 — Karyn Parsons, best known for her role as Hilary Banks on The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air, now runs an organization that makes animated short films about influential African-Americans throughout history.
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Jul 9, 2014 — While it's not exceptionally tall, the tree has a wide canopy. And it dates back to the era of Egypt's great pyramids.
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Jun 10, 2014 — Two amateur artifact hunters have managed to raise a 900-pound anchor to the surface that they believe was lost 222 years ago by one of Capt. George Vancouver's ships.
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May 23, 2014 — Descendants of the king had sued to block his burial in Leicester Cathedral, arguing his roots were in York. But a court ruled Friday his remains can stay in the city where they were found in 2012.
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May 13, 2014 — The ship sank in 1492 after hitting reefs off the Haitian coast. Undersea explorer Barry Clifford says he's working with Haiti's government to carry out an archaeological excavation of the wreck.
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Mar 18, 2014 — At the White House, the nation's highest honor for valor in action went to 24 men — three of whom are still alive. Most were Jewish or Hispanic and had been unfairly passed over.
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Feb 17, 2014 — Abraham Lincoln is known as one of America's greatest presidents. Turns out, he was also a cook who used to join his wife in the kitchen after work. In her new culinary biography of Lincoln, a food historian walks us through his life with stories — and recipes — of what he ate, cooked and served.
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Feb 10, 2014 — In the years after World War II, Eliot Elisofon traveled from Capetown to Cairo in a mobile photography studio. The pictures he took for Life magazine helped reshape Americans' understanding of the continent. Susan Stamberg takes a look at an exhibit of Elisofon's photos, currently on display at the Museum of African Art in D.C.
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Jan 29, 2014 — The P1 that Ferdinand Porsche helped develop was an electric vehicle that could chug along at 22 mph. It was discovered in an Austrian warehouse and is going on display at the Porsche museum in Stuttgart, Germany.
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