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July 31, 2014 | NPR · Tens of thousands of displaced Gazans face skyrocketing prices for limited water supplies, and severely disrupted electricity service. As well, long lines are developing for staples like bread.
 
July 31, 2014 | NPR · Christian Science Monitor reporter Christa Case Bryant tells Renee Montagne why the Israeli army is finding Hamas a more formidable foe now than during the 2009 war.
 
July 31, 2014 | NPR · Oklahoma is experiencing more earthquakes, and some scientists say they're caused by wastewater disposal wells. Linda Wertheimer learns more from energy reporter Joe Wertz of StateImpact Oklahoma.
 

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July 30, 2014 | NPR · An explosion rocked a crowded Gaza market during what was expected to be a lull in the fighting. Earlier in the day a United Nations school was hit by what U.N. officials say was Israeli artillery fire, killing at least 15 people. Meanwhile, rocket fire from Gaza continues to be fired into Israel.
 
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July 30, 2014 | NPR · Hamas militants are using tunnels in and out of Gaza to strike inside Israel. Israelis are questioning how the tunnels grew to be so complex and why the military hasn't been able to shut them down.
 
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July 30, 2014 | NPR · A food blogger says dozens of distilleries are buying rye whiskey from a factory in Indiana and using it in bottles labeled "artisan."
 

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July 26, 2014 | NPR · Hezbollah has been a longtime ally of Hamas, but during this most recent conflict between Israel and Gaza they've taken a sideline role. NPR's Scott Simon talks to the BBC's Kim Ghattas in Beirut.
 

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July 27, 2014 | NPR · Fighting in Ukraine near the crash site of Malaysia Airlines Flight MH17 has international investigators staying away. NPR's Arun Rath talks with OSCE's Michael Bociurkiw about the investigation.
 

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Nobel Prize

Jul 14, 2014 — She lived in a country where people suffered because of the color of their skin. And she had a knack for saying just the right thing to inspire us to stand up for all the world's needy souls.
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Oct 14, 2013 — The Royal Swedish Academy honors U.S. professors Eugene F. Fama, Robert J. Shiller, and Lars Peter Hansen "for their empirical analysis of asset prices."
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Oct 11, 2013 — The Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons, which won the peace prize Friday, is currently working in Syria to eliminate chemical weapons there. It's also spent years working to destroy the stockpiles in the U.S. and Russia, the countries with the largest arsenals in the world.
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Oct 7, 2013 — The Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine 2013 goes to three scientists for discovering how cells secrete hormones and neurotransmitters. The research provided sweeping insights into how the brain transmits signals, the immune system attacks pathogens and insulin gets into the bloodstream.
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Oct 7, 2013 — The trio was celebrated by the Nobel committee for unlocking a key mystery of cell function. The researchers "have revealed the exquisitely precise control system for the transport and delivery of cellular cargo," the committee says.
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Sep 5, 2013 — Also: Ladbrokes breaks down the favorites to win the Nobel Prize; Edward Albee on character; poet Natasha Trethewey on meeting Seamus Heaney.
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Oct 12, 2012 — A cardiologist has some fun plotting how a country's chocolate consumption may predict Nobel prizes. The outlier, he notes, is that Sweden, the home of the Nobel, seems to get more than its share of the prizes.
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Oct 10, 2012 — Because about half of all drugs act on the receptors that let humans sense their environment, the scientists' work has been incredibly important for the development of pharmaceuticals.
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Oct 9, 2012 — David Wineland of the National Institute of Standards and Technology is one of this year's two Nobel physics winners. NIST is the federal agency known for keeping accurate time using the atomic clock, and Wineland's Nobel has implications for even more accurate time-keeping. But what else does NIST do?
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Oct 9, 2012 — Serge Haroche of France and David Wineland of the United States have been honored for their work on the interaction between life and matter — in particular, the "fundamental interactions between light particles and matter."
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more Nobel Prize from NPR