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August 28, 2014 | NPR · For the first time, researchers have tracked the spread of Ebola, almost in real time, during an outbreak. The virus is quickly changing its genetic code. But it's unclear what the mutations mean.
 
August 29, 2014 | NPR · French President Francois Hollande is under pressure to fix the country's economy, which is overburdened by regulation and failing a generation of young people. He's also facing calls for austerity.
 
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August 29, 2014 | NPR · Congressman and former Republican vice presidential nominee Paul Ryan discusses his new book, The Way Forward: Renewing the American Idea.
 

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August 29, 2014 | NPR · The Obama administration is considering whether to broaden its air campaign against the extremist group the Islamic State by striking targets in Syria.
 
August 29, 2014 | NPR · Regular political commentators, E.J. Dionne of The Washington Post and David Brooks of The New York Times, discuss the latest in Ukraine and the actions of ISIS in Iraq and Syria.
 
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August 29, 2014 | NPR · An earthquake in Napa Valley this week brought back old fears for author Gustavo Arellano. In his anxiety he's revisiting the book A Crack in the Edge of the World.
 

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August 23, 2014 | NPR · Nearly 1,500 people have died in the Ebola outbreak, and more nations in the region are closing their borders. NPR's Scott Simon speaks to Africa correspondent Ofeibea Quist-Arcton about the epidemic.
 

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August 24, 2014 | NPR · In the wake of violent clashes between protesters and police in Ferguson, Mo., President Obama is ordering a review of the federal programs that help local police departments purchase military gear.
 

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Work

Aug 6, 2014 — Construction is booming once again in the Gulf Coast, Midwest and Rocky Mountain states. But there are about 20 percent fewer skilled workers in construction than there were in 2008.
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Jul 16, 2014 — Stinking on the job is a common problem, say pros in human resources, and a reluctance to use soap and water is rarely to blame. Medical conditions, diet or cultural differences can play a role, too.
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Jul 15, 2014 — Moms who worked full time reported significantly better physical and mental health than moms who worked part time, research involving more than 2,500 mothers found.
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Apr 17, 2014 — Workers who have a creative outlet outside the office are more likely to be creative problem solvers on the job, a study suggests. Oh, and they have more fun.
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Apr 13, 2014 — In a recent essay, David Graeber develops a playful panpsychism according to which play is the organizing principle of reality. Alva NoŽ suggests, more darkly, that it is work that organizes us all.
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Apr 10, 2014 — A French reader tells us that the agreement between unions and tech and consulting companies covers about 200,000 people - not 1 million as had been originally reported.
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Mar 21, 2014 — As e-cigarettes become popular, bosses and others continue to mull over the pros and cons of letting workers vape on the job. Are e-cigs a polluting gateway to tobacco, or do they help smokers quit?
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Apr 18, 2012 — The TV show Mad Men has won fans for breathing life — and a heavy whiff of bourbon — into the fictional workplace of the 1960s. And it seems that some U.S. companies are still at it — at least, they're making sure their employees have easy access to liquor and beer.
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Mar 30, 2012 — Do you think you'd be less stressed out if you took your dog to work with you? Science agrees. Employees with dogs were less stressed out than their coworkers, new research finds. But it works only if the dog is polite.
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Jan 26, 2012 — People who work long hours are more likely to become depressed, even if they're working in the executive suite. That's according to a study of British civil servants. Other studies have found that people with higher incomes are less vulnerable to depression, but they didn't factor in work hours.
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