Latest News from NPR

on:

NCPR is supported by:

 
Hourly Newscast
4 min., 45 sec.

Programs

Latest program rundown

Coming up:

Latest Features:
Tommy Trenchard for NPR
August 28, 2014 | NPR · For the first time, researchers have tracked the spread of Ebola, almost in real time, during an outbreak. The virus is quickly changing its genetic code. But it's unclear what the mutations mean.
 
August 29, 2014 | NPR · French President Francois Hollande is under pressure to fix the country's economy, which is overburdened by regulation and failing a generation of young people. He's also facing calls for austerity.
 
Getty Images
August 29, 2014 | NPR · Congressman and former Republican vice presidential nominee Paul Ryan discusses his new book, The Way Forward: Renewing the American Idea.
 

Latest program rundown

Coming up:

Latest Features:
AP
August 29, 2014 | NPR · The Obama administration is considering whether to broaden its air campaign against the extremist group the Islamic State by striking targets in Syria.
 
August 29, 2014 | NPR · Regular political commentators, E.J. Dionne of The Washington Post and David Brooks of The New York Times, discuss the latest in Ukraine and the actions of ISIS in Iraq and Syria.
 
Getty Images
August 29, 2014 | NPR · An earthquake in Napa Valley this week brought back old fears for author Gustavo Arellano. In his anxiety he's revisiting the book A Crack in the Edge of the World.
 

Latest Saturday rundown




WE Saturday Feature

August 30, 2014 | NPR · Ukrainian forces are defending the port city of Novoazovsk from what they say is a Russian invasion. Scott Simon talks to correspondent Soraya Sarhaddi Nelson.
 

Latest Sunday rundown


WE Sunday Feature

August 24, 2014 | NPR · In the wake of violent clashes between protesters and police in Ferguson, Mo., President Obama is ordering a review of the federal programs that help local police departments purchase military gear.
 

Latest program rundown

Coming up:

Language

Jul 26, 2014 — Linguists and native speakers around the world are turning to Facebook, Twitter and other sites to help pass indigenous, minority and endangered languages on to new generations.
Comments |
Jul 15, 2014 — It's not easy to scan a baby brain, so scientists used a kind of scanner that lets the infants wiggle at will. They could see how speech sounds activate motor regions in babies' brains.
Comments |
Apr 21, 2014 — If you're inclined, you could soon speak Tlingit, Inupiaq, or Siberian Yupik in Alaska with the knowledge that those and 18 other languages (including English) are officially recognized by the state.
Comments |
Jan 24, 2014 — The Oxford English Dictionary is at work on a monumental third edition. Why? We didn't have the OED before the 1850s. Is it so unthinkable that we should do without it going forward? What are dictionaries for, anyway? Alva NoŽ wonders.
Comments |
Nov 19, 2013 — Sorry, "twerking" fans. Your word didn't come close according to the experts at Oxford Dictionaries. When everyone who is anyone seems to have posted a photo of themselves on the Web, "selfie" was the natural choice.
Comments |
Nov 14, 2013 — Being bilingual opens up new worlds to speakers. It also appears to hold off the onset of dementia. Commentator Barbara King says that for these reasons, and more, she wishes her language faculty was more robust.
Comments |
Nov 11, 2013 — It feels natural to say: "huh?" According to a team of linguists in the Netherlands, this word — huh? — is universal. Commentator Alva NoŽ wonders if that's really possible. Do universal words exists, words common to every language here on Earth?
Comments |
Sep 2, 2013 — Even infants too young to discern the meaning of words seem better able to learn while listening to the sound of human speech than while listening to nonsense — speech run backward. Little surprise there, perhaps, but a study shows that recordings of lemur calls spark learning, too.
Launch in player | Comments |
Jul 29, 2013 — Are prisoners more or less likely to cooperate with each other than college students? Running the "prisoner's dilemma" experiment on both groups is one way to try and answer this question. Commentator Tania Lombrozo digs into the findings and uncovers a new problem: the "publisher's dilemma."
Comments |
Jul 22, 2013 — What makes a language different enough from its predecessors to count as something more than a new dialect? Commentator Tania Lombrozo considers how the human mind's drive for clean categories shapes our understanding of linguistics and biology.
Comments |
more Language from NPR