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July 28, 2014 | NPR · Argentina says it cannot pay certain debts and will fall into default by July 31 if it can't come to an agreement with creditors. This would be Argentina's second default in 13 years.
 
July 28, 2014 | NPR · Even though Spain's economy is out of recession, youth unemployment has hit 57.7 percent — more than double the continent's average. Economists say it could be years before jobs return. By then, many Spanish 20-somethings — dubbed the "lost generation" — will have missed a decade or more of work.
 
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July 28, 2014 | NPR · To withstand their 9,300-mile migration, red knots feast on eggs from horseshoe crabs each spring in Delaware Bay. Scientists worry many crabs are starting to lay eggs before the birds can get there.
 

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July 27, 2014 | NPR · Israel and Hamas carried out a rhetorical battle Sunday over the fate of dueling offers to extend a ceasefire. In the end, the fighting resumed after Saturday's 12-hour truce. Israel vowed to continue its military campaign, targeting tunnels along the border. Wary Gazans prepared as best they could for the feast that marks the end of Ramadan.
 
July 27, 2014 | NPR · Anne Barnard from The New York Times talks with NPR's Eric Westervelt about the differences between the current explosion of violence in Gaza and previous ones.
 
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July 27, 2014 | NPR · The Harrier Jump Jet is known for vertical take-offs and landings. It also has an accident-prone track record, but that didn't dissuade one pilot from buying his dream plane.
 

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July 26, 2014 | NPR · Hezbollah has been a longtime ally of Hamas, but during this most recent conflict between Israel and Gaza they've taken a sideline role. NPR's Scott Simon talks to the BBC's Kim Ghattas in Beirut.
 

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July 27, 2014 | NPR · Fighting in Ukraine near the crash site of Malaysia Airlines Flight MH17 has international investigators staying away. NPR's Arun Rath talks with OSCE's Michael Bociurkiw about the investigation.
 

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Language

Jul 26, 2014 — Linguists and native speakers around the world are turning to Facebook, Twitter and other sites to help pass indigenous, minority and endangered languages on to new generations.
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Jul 15, 2014 — It's not easy to scan a baby brain, so scientists used a kind of scanner that lets the infants wiggle at will. They could see how speech sounds activate motor regions in babies' brains.
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Apr 21, 2014 — If you're inclined, you could soon speak Tlingit, Inupiaq, or Siberian Yupik in Alaska with the knowledge that those and 18 other languages (including English) are officially recognized by the state.
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Jan 24, 2014 — The Oxford English Dictionary is at work on a monumental third edition. Why? We didn't have the OED before the 1850s. Is it so unthinkable that we should do without it going forward? What are dictionaries for, anyway? Alva No wonders.
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Nov 19, 2013 — Sorry, "twerking" fans. Your word didn't come close according to the experts at Oxford Dictionaries. When everyone who is anyone seems to have posted a photo of themselves on the Web, "selfie" was the natural choice.
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Nov 14, 2013 — Being bilingual opens up new worlds to speakers. It also appears to hold off the onset of dementia. Commentator Barbara King says that for these reasons, and more, she wishes her language faculty was more robust.
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Nov 11, 2013 — It feels natural to say: "huh?" According to a team of linguists in the Netherlands, this word — huh? — is universal. Commentator Alva No wonders if that's really possible. Do universal words exists, words common to every language here on Earth?
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Sep 2, 2013 — Even infants too young to discern the meaning of words seem better able to learn while listening to the sound of human speech than while listening to nonsense — speech run backward. Little surprise there, perhaps, but a study shows that recordings of lemur calls spark learning, too.
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Jul 29, 2013 — Are prisoners more or less likely to cooperate with each other than college students? Running the "prisoner's dilemma" experiment on both groups is one way to try and answer this question. Commentator Tania Lombrozo digs into the findings and uncovers a new problem: the "publisher's dilemma."
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Jul 22, 2013 — What makes a language different enough from its predecessors to count as something more than a new dialect? Commentator Tania Lombrozo considers how the human mind's drive for clean categories shapes our understanding of linguistics and biology.
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