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April 23, 2014 | NPR · They say they were placed on the list for refusing to inform on other Muslims. The suit is part of a broad wave of cases challenging the secretive no-fly list and U.S. counterterrorism strategies.
 
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April 23, 2014 | NPR · Activists say a federal law that allows employers to pay people with disabilities pennies per hour is out of date and should be changed. But some say the law is a lifeline for the disabled.
 
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April 23, 2014 | NPR · Shakespeare's Globe Theater aims to take the Bard's iconic play to every country in the world. They'll perform everywhere from prestigious theaters to Pacific island beaches.
 

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April 22, 2014 | NPR · Washington Gov. Jay Inslee offers an update on the deadly mudslides near the town of Oso in March. President Obama is visiting Oso on Tuesday.
 
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April 22, 2014 | NPR · The Army plans to take all Apache attack helicopters from the National Guard. The Guard says that's an insult, but Army leaders say it's not personal — it's just about saving money.
 
April 22, 2014 | NPR · The White House named Neil Eggleston its new top lawyer. He'll have to muster his legal and political skills to deal with a divided Congress and multiple investigations of the Obama's administration.
 

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April 19, 2014 | NPR · The search continues for hundreds of people, mostly students, who were on board a South Korean ferry when it sank this week. Correspondent Anthony Kuhn shares the latest with NPR's Wade Goodwyn.
 

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April 20, 2014 | NPR · Monday is the 2014 Boston Marathon. Security will be tight, and this year's race will be an emotional event that will be about more than who wins.
 

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Native Americans

Dec 11, 2013 — Twenty-four items sold for $530,000 this week in Paris. The Los Angeles-based Annenberg Foundation turned out to be the buyer, and says it stepped in after a French court rejected efforts to halt the auction.
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Sep 12, 2013 — Suicide rates among Native Americans are already four times the national average. And with recent cuts in federal funding for mental health services across the country, suicide prevention programs may lose ground in the communities that need them most.
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Aug 19, 2013 — A reporter runs into a conundrum: how to describe a sacred Hopi item without using certain forbidden words to do so.
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Aug 9, 2013 — An NPR investigation into foster care for American Indian children in South Dakota took on a serious issue but failed in several crucial respects. The series alleged that state social workers took children from their families as a way to get federal funds and put them in white homes out of cultural bias. While acknowledging secondary problems, editors defend the series, which won prizes. I find, however, that it violated NPR's standards because it lacked proof and failed to give the state's side on key points. The series also was characterized by an unfair tone, factual errors, misleading data and inadequate context. It should not have aired as it was. This introduction summarizes a six-chapter report on how not to do investigative storytelling.
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Aug 9, 2013 — The willful taking of American Indian children from their families was presented in the NPR investigation as the baseline of alleged widespread abuse of the foster care system by the state of South Dakota. But the series offered no documented proof, and it failed to fully discuss the centrally relevant matter of child neglect. The series also failed to report that South Dakota reservations have some of the highest levels in the country of alcoholism, drug abuse, violence, teenage pregnancy and similar ills. Many families there are struggling and falling apart.
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Aug 9, 2013 — The headline number in the NPR investigation into foster care for Native American children in South Dakota was that the state receives nearly $100 million a year in federal funds. The series alleged that this money — a large amount in a poor state — is driving state abuses of Native American children. Without clearly telling us, however, the $100 million number is poorly sourced and pumped up by including white children and adoptions. The state says it receives less than a quarter of that amount for Indians, even including funds for Medicaid and adoptions. The reporters have not given me information proving the state wrong.
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Aug 9, 2013 — The NPR investigation made inflated and misleading allegations that the state of South Dakota systematically puts American Indian children into white foster homes out of a cultural bias reminiscent of old Indian boarding schools. The series failed to report that the tribes' own judges make 40 percent of the foster home placements, often with the involvement of tribal social workers, and that there is an acute shortage of Native American foster homes. The series also ignored a companion program in which Indian children are indeed being put in Indian homes.
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Aug 9, 2013 — The conceptual basis of NPR's faulty investigation of American Indian foster care in South Dakota was a narrow — and misleading — interpretation of the federal Indian Child Welfare Act. By focusing mostly on the act's call for protecting Indian culture, the series failed to discuss the equally important need to protect children. The series also ignored historic Indian sovereignty issues and changing concepts of race.
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Jul 1, 2013 — Anderson was the first woman to lead a Minnesota Indian tribe, and led efforts to secure tribal hunting and fishing rights on Lake Mille Lacs. She died Saturday at age 81 of natural causes.
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Apr 16, 2013 — Former South Dakota Sen. James Abourezk drafted the law, meant to prevent Native American children from being removed from their homes by the state. The law is at the center of an emotional child custody case in front of the Supreme Court.
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