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April 16, 2014 | NPR · Schoolgirls were kidnapped in Nigeria Tuesday. The suspects are believed to be with a radical group blamed for a bombing Monday. Kelly McEvers talks to Michelle Faul of The Associated Press.
 
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April 16, 2014 | NPR · Fans and foes want to know whether the Affordable Care Act is meeting its goals. But, for good reasons, there are no clear answers yet.
 
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April 16, 2014 | NPR · A year after the Boston Marathon bombing, Heather Abbott has adapted to life with her prostheses, including a blade for running and one that allows her to wear her favorite shoes.
 

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April 16, 2014 | NPR · Ukrainian tanks arrived in the city of Kramatorsk Wednesday morning. By the time they rolled out of the city, they were flying Russian flags. People in Kramatorsk tell the story of what happened.
 
April 16, 2014 | NPR · NATO has announced a strengthening of its forces near the alliance's eastern border. Gen. George Joulwan, the former NATO supreme allied commander for Europe, discusses the plan.
 
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April 16, 2014 | NPR · A priest in Naples' tough Sanità neighborhood has put local kids — some from mob families — to work restoring underground catacombs full of early Christian art. The result? 40,000 tourists a year.
 

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April 12, 2014 | NPR · As pro-Russia demonstrators continue their tense standoff in Eastern Ukraine, police are conspicuously absent from city streets.
 

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April 13, 2014 | NPR · As the anniversary of last year's marathon bombing approaches, NPR's Rachel Martin speaks with correspondent Carrie Johnson about the investigation and legal wrangling yet to come.
 

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summer

Jun 3, 2013 — It's not easy making friends with wild animals, especially when the animal is impossibly small, very shy, hiding under a pile of leaves. But when the writer Rachel Carson heard a "ting! ting! ting!" coming from her backyard — like someone ringing a teeny bell — she had to meet this creature, the one she called "the Fairy Bell Ringer."
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May 26, 2013 — Today, heading out to a picnic often means a simple blanket and a basket packed with the outing's repast. But back in the day, outdoor feasts were much grander affairs, with crystal, servants, tables and gourmet fare.
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Sep 3, 2012 — There are days can't be set down on a calendar a year in advance. They can't be planned for. Their appearance is a testament to the fact that we are more than rational, calculating machines lifted miraculously above the natural world.
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Jul 20, 2012 — Commentator Barbara J. King recommends five novels that touch on topics in the natural and social sciences. She connects them with themes taken up here by the five writers at the 13.7 Cosmos and Culture blog.
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Jun 28, 2012 — From the Ugandan forest to a Cameroonian sanctuary to a U.S. zoo, three students devote their summer to research and conservation work with primates. Commentator Barbara J. King cheers on this trio — and the thousands of other college kids who'll take up science this summer.
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Aug 15, 2011 — Summer is the ideal time for visiting amusement parks, braving the heat and riding roller coasters. But what would it be like to ride every roller coaster in America? Talk intern Kirstin Garriss talked with one man who attempted to conquer every roller coaster in America this summer.
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Jul 14, 2011 — America's South, Midwest and Southwest are suffering through drought and high heat. The AP reports, "temperatures remained in the 100s with heat indexes reaching above 110 degrees. Overnight lows have not dropped below 80 degrees in many cities."
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Jun 16, 2010 — It's a summer tradition for many people: the stressed-out summer vacation. Melinda Beck tells us in the Wall Street Journal how to avoid that fate.
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