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August 22, 2014 | NPR · The standoff between the U.S. and Russia over Ukraine has raised the specter of a new Cold War. David Greene talks to Julie Ioffe, of the New Republic, about what Russia's next move may be in Ukraine.
 
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August 22, 2014 | NPR · Even just the word Ebola is kind of terrifying. Why? Hollywood has a lot to do with it. But Ebola outbreaks also have all the ingredients for what one psychologist calls the "dread factor."
 
August 22, 2014 | NPR · Census Bureau data show a wider gap between rich and poor. Kelly McEvers explores this with economist Enrico Moretti of the University of California-Berkeley, author of The New Geography of Jobs.
 

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August 22, 2014 | NPR · It's been another rough August for President Obama. He's wrapping up a summer vacation marred by events in Ferguson, Mo., and the murder of an American journalist in the Middle East.
 
August 22, 2014 | NPR · Regular political commentators, E.J. Dionne of The Washington Post and Reihan Salam of The National Review, discuss the killing of American journalist James Foley and the ongoing conflict in Ferguson, Mo.
 
August 22, 2014 | NPR · The scent of fresh pencils is in the air, and homework assignments are around the corner. In honor of back-to-school season, author Alexander Aciman recommends The Lost Estate by Henri Alain-Fournier.
 

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August 16, 2014 | NPR · Both Ukraine and Russia say they're trying to send supplies to residents in eastern Ukraine. But with tensions on both sides running high, that aid may take a while to arrive.
 

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August 17, 2014 | NPR · American fighter jets and drones carried out airstrikes against Islamist targets near the Mosul Dam in northern Iraq on Saturday. A breach of the dam could threaten entire cities.
 

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Fish

Aug 17, 2014 — Invasive fish like snakeheads and Asian carp are threatening to wipe out aquatic ecosystems across the U.S. So chefs and environmental agencies are encouraging their communities to eat them up.
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Aug 14, 2014 — After learning that they'd spent decades restocking Colorado's lakes and streams with the wrong fish, biologists are now ready to release the right one.
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Jul 26, 2014 — Salmon fishing on a scenic river in Alaska isn't always about hooking a big fish in the remote wilderness. Sometimes, it's about standing shoulder-to-shoulder in the water to fill up your freezer.
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Jul 11, 2014 — The largest school of the tiny fish seen in 30 years was spotted earlier this week off La Jolla, Calif.
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Jun 17, 2014 — From ruby red tuna to turquoise lingcod, the fish we eat can span the color spectrum. Flesh color can also tell us something about where a fish came from, its swimming routine and what it ate.
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Jun 10, 2014 — Many mothers-to-be and breastfeeding women were turned off of fish out of mercury concerns. A study finds many of these women now eat too little fish, so two agencies are recommending they eat more.
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Jun 6, 2014 — Farmed fish production will have to more than double by 2050 to keep up with global demand, a report finds. And aquaculture can be far more sustainable than meat production, the researchers say.
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May 23, 2014 — We love raw seafood but can't stand uncooked fowl or pork. Why? A big part of it is the effective lack of gravity in water, a scientist says. Weightlessness gives fish muscles a smooth, soft texture.
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Apr 2, 2014 — Tuna, swordfish and other migratory fishes are being overfished by vessels on the high seas. A new proposal says we should close these international waters for a few years to let the fishes rebound.
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Mar 21, 2014 — Nine American fisheries together throw overboard as much as 340 million pounds of fish and other species they were not trying to catch, a report finds. Much of it is perfectly edible fish.
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