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August 21, 2014 | NPR · The attorney general hugged community leaders, a highway patrol captain and the mother of Michael Brown during his visit, and got an update on the federal investigation into the teen's shooting.
 
August 21, 2014 | NPR · At McCluer High School, 30 varsity football players — all black, mostly from Ferguson — practice. David Greene talks to Sports Illustrated writer Robert Klemko about his story, "Football in Ferguson."
 
August 21, 2014 | NPR · Kelly McEvers talks to Syria expert Shashank Joshi, about President Bashar al-Assad's tenacious grip on power. Joshi is with the Royal Services Institute in London.
 

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August 21, 2014 | KWMU · The violence at night in Ferguson, Mo., has calmed down for now. However, there have been more than 160 people arrested since the protests began. Police records offer a sense of who they are.
 
August 21, 2014 | NPR · The aftermath of the police shooting in Ferguson, Mo., has focused attention on police-involved killings more broadly in the U.S. But statistics on shootings by police are scarce. To learn why, Audie Cornish speaks with David Klinger, an associate professor at the University of Missouri in St. Louis.
 
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August 21, 2014 | NPR · The hunt is on to identify the man in the James Foley execution video who speaks with a British accent. An estimated 2,000 Europeans have left home to join the Islamic State in Syria and Iraq.
 

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August 16, 2014 | NPR · Both Ukraine and Russia say they're trying to send supplies to residents in eastern Ukraine. But with tensions on both sides running high, that aid may take a while to arrive.
 

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August 17, 2014 | NPR · American fighter jets and drones carried out airstrikes against Islamist targets near the Mosul Dam in northern Iraq on Saturday. A breach of the dam could threaten entire cities.
 

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Follow The Money

Aug 13, 2014 — A more detailed account about what happened to Lois Lerner's computer is now available. But critics say there are still lots of unanswered questions.
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Jul 23, 2014 — The latest version of the DISCLOSE Act, which would force donor disclosure on outside organizations that engage in election politics, is facing now-familiar opposition from Republican lawmakers.
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Jul 3, 2014 — After a big explosion last year, Texans are worried about what's in nearby chemical plants. Attorney General Greg Abbott, who's running for governor, isn't making it easier for them to find out.
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Jul 1, 2014 — At a time when congressional approval ratings are at rock bottom, the House Ethics Committee quietly made it harder to track privately financed trips taken by members of Congress.
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May 20, 2014 — According to an analysis of Affordable Care Act advertising, an unprecedented amount of money was spent on negative ads attacking the law. And very little was spent defending it.
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Apr 16, 2014 — Former New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg is committing more of his considerable fortune to getting gun safety laws passed. The initiative will support a grass-roots effort that seeks to enlist women.
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Apr 15, 2014 — Topping the list of the former GOP presidential candidate's creditors is an air charter company called Moby Dick Airways. The second biggest creditor? Newt Gingrich himself.
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Apr 9, 2014 — House Republicans cite the former IRS official's attempt to single out Karl Rove's nonprofit — the one that spent $165 million attacking Democrats and helping Republicans.
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Mar 22, 2014 — Each year, the U.S. loads thousands of tons of coal onto a barge and sends it across the Atlantic. It doesn't make a lot of sense, but no one is trying to end the practice.
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Feb 21, 2014 — No fewer than three new superPACs are working to elect their preferred candidates for secretary of state positions, even though officials overseeing elections are supposed to be neutral.
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