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July 31, 2014 | NPR · Tens of thousands of displaced Gazans face skyrocketing prices for limited water supplies, and severely disrupted electricity service. As well, long lines are developing for staples like bread.
 
July 31, 2014 | NPR · Christian Science Monitor reporter Christa Case Bryant tells Renee Montagne why the Israeli army is finding Hamas a more formidable foe now than during the 2009 war.
 
July 31, 2014 | NPR · Oklahoma is experiencing more earthquakes, and some scientists say they're caused by wastewater disposal wells. Linda Wertheimer learns more from energy reporter Joe Wertz of StateImpact Oklahoma.
 

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July 30, 2014 | NPR · An explosion rocked a crowded Gaza market during what was expected to be a lull in the fighting. Earlier in the day a United Nations school was hit by what U.N. officials say was Israeli artillery fire, killing at least 15 people. Meanwhile, rocket fire from Gaza continues to be fired into Israel.
 
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July 30, 2014 | NPR · Hamas militants are using tunnels in and out of Gaza to strike inside Israel. Israelis are questioning how the tunnels grew to be so complex and why the military hasn't been able to shut them down.
 
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July 30, 2014 | NPR · A food blogger says dozens of distilleries are buying rye whiskey from a factory in Indiana and using it in bottles labeled "artisan."
 

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July 26, 2014 | NPR · Hezbollah has been a longtime ally of Hamas, but during this most recent conflict between Israel and Gaza they've taken a sideline role. NPR's Scott Simon talks to the BBC's Kim Ghattas in Beirut.
 

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July 27, 2014 | NPR · Fighting in Ukraine near the crash site of Malaysia Airlines Flight MH17 has international investigators staying away. NPR's Arun Rath talks with OSCE's Michael Bociurkiw about the investigation.
 

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cooking

Jun 23, 2014 — The horrible memory of overcooked vegetables can and should be overcome, because yes, kale is really good for you. A cookbook author shares tips for making sure these veggies actually taste good, too.
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Dec 24, 2013 — A beauty product in the kitchen? Cooking gurus have been advocating this secret weapon since the 1970s to achieve crispy duck skin that will blow them away (sorry!). Here at NPR, we also used the salon appliance to make some killer s'mores.
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Nov 18, 2013 — Dust off that old Mr. Coffee! We've stumbled upon a wacky use for classic coffee makers: Cook a three-course meal for one. From poached salmon and pumpkin soup to steamed broccoli and couscous, the possibilities are endless. But why in the world would anyone want to cook this way?
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Sep 4, 2013 — Range hoods are designed to capture the pollutants from your stove, but many models are not effective and it's hard for consumers to know how good a hood is. But researchers at Lawrence Berkeley National Lab are developing a new standardized test that manufacturers can use to rate their range hoods.
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Aug 25, 2013 — Surprisingly enough, people have been poaching salmon in their dishwashers for decades. Now one Italian cook has expanded the technique to meats, side dishes and desserts. And she's found a trick to make the method more environmentally friendly.
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May 24, 2013 — Does the kind of charcoal you use really make a difference when it comes to grilling up a tasty steak or other food on the grill? Yes — but deciding which one to use depends on what you're after. Both briquettes and lump charcoal — aka "natural" hardwood charcoal — have their advantages and disadvantages.
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Apr 11, 2013 — Adventurous food shopping get you in trouble? Get help from creative cooks through the Cook Your Cupboard project.
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Apr 10, 2013 — Humans were using cookware as early as 15,000 years ago, according to a new analysis of ancient Japanese ceramic pots. Those first meals? Fish soup.
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Feb 9, 2013 — If your front yard is buried under drifts, treat yourself to some snow cuisine. It's like making lemons out of lemonade — just steer clear of any lemon-colored snow outside, please. Sugar on snow and snow cream are two sweet places to start.
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Feb 6, 2013 — There's nothing better on a cold day than a warm bowl of soup. But when did our ancestors first brew up this tasty broth? New archaeological evidence suggests that soup making could be tens of thousands of years old.
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