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April 17, 2014 | NPR · Scientists and food activists are launching a campaign to promote seeds that can be freely shared, rather than protected through patents and licenses. They call it the Open Source Seed Initiative.
 
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April 17, 2014 | NPR · A typical UPS truck now has hundreds of sensors on it. That's changing the way UPS drivers work — and it foreshadows changes coming for workers throughout the economy.
 
April 17, 2014 | NPR · Brazil is the spiritual home of soccer and a world powerhouse in the sport. It's woven into the Brazilian psyche. Wins and losses have had repercussions in other realms — including politics.
 

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April 16, 2014 | NPR · Ukrainian tanks arrived in the city of Kramatorsk Wednesday morning. By the time they rolled out of the city, they were flying Russian flags. People in Kramatorsk tell the story of what happened.
 
April 16, 2014 | NPR · NATO has announced a strengthening of its forces near the alliance's eastern border. Gen. George Joulwan, the former NATO supreme allied commander for Europe, discusses the plan.
 
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April 16, 2014 | NPR · A 325 million-year-old fossil find shows that the gill structures of modern sharks are actually quite different from their ancient ancestors.
 

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April 12, 2014 | NPR · As pro-Russia demonstrators continue their tense standoff in Eastern Ukraine, police are conspicuously absent from city streets.
 

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April 13, 2014 | NPR · As the anniversary of last year's marathon bombing approaches, NPR's Rachel Martin speaks with correspondent Carrie Johnson about the investigation and legal wrangling yet to come.
 

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cooking

Dec 24, 2013 — A beauty product in the kitchen? Cooking gurus have been advocating this secret weapon since the 1970s to achieve crispy duck skin that will blow them away (sorry!). Here at NPR, we also used the salon appliance to make some killer s'mores.
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Nov 18, 2013 — Dust off that old Mr. Coffee! We've stumbled upon a wacky use for classic coffee makers: Cook a three-course meal for one. From poached salmon and pumpkin soup to steamed broccoli and couscous, the possibilities are endless. But why in the world would anyone want to cook this way?
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Sep 4, 2013 — Range hoods are designed to capture the pollutants from your stove, but many models are not effective and it's hard for consumers to know how good a hood is. But researchers at Lawrence Berkeley National Lab are developing a new standardized test that manufacturers can use to rate their range hoods.
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Aug 25, 2013 — Surprisingly enough, people have been poaching salmon in their dishwashers for decades. Now one Italian cook has expanded the technique to meats, side dishes and desserts. And she's found a trick to make the method more environmentally friendly.
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May 24, 2013 — Does the kind of charcoal you use really make a difference when it comes to grilling up a tasty steak or other food on the grill? Yes — but deciding which one to use depends on what you're after. Both briquettes and lump charcoal — aka "natural" hardwood charcoal — have their advantages and disadvantages.
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Apr 11, 2013 — Adventurous food shopping get you in trouble? Get help from creative cooks through the Cook Your Cupboard project.
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Apr 10, 2013 — Humans were using cookware as early as 15,000 years ago, according to a new analysis of ancient Japanese ceramic pots. Those first meals? Fish soup.
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Feb 9, 2013 — If your front yard is buried under drifts, treat yourself to some snow cuisine. It's like making lemons out of lemonade — just steer clear of any lemon-colored snow outside, please. Sugar on snow and snow cream are two sweet places to start.
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Feb 6, 2013 — There's nothing better on a cold day than a warm bowl of soup. But when did our ancestors first brew up this tasty broth? New archaeological evidence suggests that soup making could be tens of thousands of years old.
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Dec 8, 2012 — The cheese-and-spinach-filled food called a boyo was once served on the Shabbat tables of Jews who lived in the Ottoman Empire. Today, the Turkish-style pastries are mostly reserved for the holidays.
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