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August 20, 2014 | NPR · If you venture away from the protest zone in Ferguson, Mo., there is an idyllic neighborhood, which doesn't have much patience for the out-of-towners who have joined the protests.
 
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August 20, 2014 | NPR · President Obama has carefully avoided taking sides following the shooting of Missouri teen Michael Brown, disappointing some African-American observers.
 
August 20, 2014 | NPR · Texas ranks 49th out of 50 states in how much funding it commits to mental health. But San Antonio has become a model for other mental health systems. It has saved $50 million over the past 5 years.
 

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Courtesy of Doctors Without Borders
August 19, 2014 | NPR · Dr. Joanne Liu of Doctors Without Borders says fear and a lack of sense of urgency has kept the international community in their home countries rather than stepping up to the plate in West Africa.
 
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August 19, 2014 | NPR · The type of Ebola erupting in West Africa is closely related to one found 2,500 miles away — the distance between Boston and San Francisco. How did the virus spread so far without anyone noticing?
 
August 19, 2014 | NPR · Iranian poet and women's rights advocate Simin Behbahani has died. Her work probed the social and political challenges that faced Iran after its Islamic Revolution. She was 87.
 

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August 16, 2014 | NPR · Both Ukraine and Russia say they're trying to send supplies to residents in eastern Ukraine. But with tensions on both sides running high, that aid may take a while to arrive.
 

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August 17, 2014 | NPR · American fighter jets and drones carried out airstrikes against Islamist targets near the Mosul Dam in northern Iraq on Saturday. A breach of the dam could threaten entire cities.
 

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Malaria

Aug 5, 2014 — The most effective drug we have against malaria is losing its potency in Southeast Asia. Doctors can still cure most forms of the disease, but it takes longer and more medications.
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Jul 13, 2014 — Crossword puzzles steer away from diseases. They're too depressing! But they have a habit of sneaking in. Here's a look at clues used by The New York Times for some infamous global health ailments.
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Jul 9, 2014 — Nick Stadlberger, a medical student at Dartmouth, spent a month volunteering at Muhimbili Hospital in Dar es Salaam. The scariest moment, he says, was when he boarded a dala dala bus.
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May 22, 2014 — Most attempts at a malaria vaccine have unsuccessfully tried to keep the parasite from breaking into red blood cells. But a new twist that keeps the parasite from escaping the cells may work better.
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May 13, 2014 — A malaria patient can carry different parasites that respond differently to drugs. Now there's a way to profile the parasites, which could someday lead to more tailored treatments.
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Apr 24, 2014 — The Microsoft founder and philanthropist talks with NPR's David Greene about why he's spent billions on health efforts in developing countries, and about the prospect of beating polio and malaria.
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Apr 8, 2014 — The $31.3 billion given by wealthy nations, aid groups, charities, large foundations and others in 2013 reflects the shifting mix of donors backing international health projects, an analysis suggests.
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Jan 3, 2014 — Malaria remains one of the deadliest diseases worldwide. But the U.S. successfully wiped out the mosquito-borne parasite from the American South in the early part of the 20th century. One researcher thinks this successful campaign offers lessons for how to stop malaria worldwide.
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Dec 11, 2013 — The billions of dollars spent by governments and foundations to fight malaria are starting to pay off. The death rate from the mosquito-borne disease has dropped by 45 percent worldwide since 2012. Malaria kills more than 600,000 people each year.
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Oct 8, 2013 — A decades-long effort to prevent one of the world's leading scourges has resulted in a vaccine with only modest efficacy. Still, the shot has the potential to save hundreds of thousands of lives each year. So its developers are seeking regulatory approval in 2014.
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more Malaria from NPR