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August 20, 2014 | NPR · If you venture away from the protest zone in Ferguson, Mo., there is an idyllic neighborhood, which doesn't have much patience for the out-of-towners who have joined the protests.
 
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August 20, 2014 | NPR · President Obama has carefully avoided taking sides following the shooting of Missouri teen Michael Brown, disappointing some African-American observers.
 
August 20, 2014 | NPR · Texas ranks 49th out of 50 states in how much funding it commits to mental health. But San Antonio has become a model for other mental health systems. It has saved $50 million over the past 5 years.
 

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August 19, 2014 | NPR · Dr. Joanne Liu of Doctors Without Borders says fear and a lack of sense of urgency has kept the international community in their home countries rather than stepping up to the plate in West Africa.
 
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August 19, 2014 | NPR · The type of Ebola erupting in West Africa is closely related to one found 2,500 miles away — the distance between Boston and San Francisco. How did the virus spread so far without anyone noticing?
 
August 19, 2014 | NPR · Iranian poet and women's rights advocate Simin Behbahani has died. Her work probed the social and political challenges that faced Iran after its Islamic Revolution. She was 87.
 

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August 16, 2014 | NPR · Both Ukraine and Russia say they're trying to send supplies to residents in eastern Ukraine. But with tensions on both sides running high, that aid may take a while to arrive.
 

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August 17, 2014 | NPR · American fighter jets and drones carried out airstrikes against Islamist targets near the Mosul Dam in northern Iraq on Saturday. A breach of the dam could threaten entire cities.
 

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computers

Jul 8, 2014 — Using food as a reward, a Lab named Thoreau has been trained to detect the scent of flash drives and other devices that can hold illegal images and video.
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Mar 28, 2014 — Children playing on phones or using computers eat less junk food than those watching TV, a study finds. Maybe it's the commercials. Or maybe it's just hard to pick up a chip while tapping away.
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Mar 13, 2014 — A new study by Pew Research Internet Project has a surprise: people who use the old-school local library also tend to be highly engaged with technology.
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Jan 24, 2014 — In January 1984, Apple aired one of most iconic commercials in Super Bowl history — introducing the Macintosh computer. The marketing helped position Apple as a plucky upstart, and the machine fundamentally changed the way people interacted with computers.
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Dec 23, 2013 — The British mathematician, also considered the father of modern computing, committed suicide in 1954 after being convicted of "gross indecency" with another man.
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Sep 4, 2013 — Writing in Nature, a team of scientists say they've figured out how to reduce the infrastructure needed for such a system.
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Jul 3, 2013 — U.S. inventor and Doug Engelbart, the man known as the father of the computer mouse and a thinker who helped introduce other key innovations, died Wednesday morning at age 88. His death was announced today by the Computer History Museum.
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May 30, 2013 — In the more than eight years since it was written, the open-source operating system Ubuntu's "Bug #1" was seen as a rallying call: "Microsoft has a majority market share." But the entry was officially closed Thursday, as Ubuntu leader Mark Shuttleworth said things had changed since 2004.
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Mar 4, 2013 — A competition to encourage entrepreneurs to design health apps came up with a wide range of possibilities. One app audits medical bills for errors and savings. Another helps find prices for services, such as dental exams, for people without insurance coverage.
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Jan 16, 2013 — What began as a company's suspicion that its infrastructure was being hacked turned into a case of a worker outsourcing his own job to a Chinese consulting firm, according to reports that cite an investigation by Verizon's security team. The man was earning a six-figure salary.
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