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July 30, 2014 | KQED · Adding a translation to the English label would require bigger bottles, pharmacists say. They worry patients would wind up carrying a few pills around loose — without any instructions at all.
 
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July 30, 2014 | WNYC · In the past 20 years, New Jersey went from having more than 20 percent of U.S. pharmaceutical manufacturing jobs to less than 10 percent. That means offices, labs and warehouses have gone dark.
 
July 30, 2014 | NPR · Sheik Humarr Khan, one of the doctors fighting to control West Africa's largest Ebola outbreak, died Tuesday in Sierra Leone. He was 39.
 

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July 30, 2014 | NPR · An explosion rocked a crowded Gaza market during what was expected to be a lull in the fighting. Earlier in the day a United Nations school was hit by what U.N. officials say was Israeli artillery fire, killing at least 15 people. Meanwhile, rocket fire from Gaza continues to be fired into Israel.
 
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July 30, 2014 | NPR · Hamas militants are using tunnels in and out of Gaza to strike inside Israel. Israelis are questioning how the tunnels grew to be so complex and why the military hasn't been able to shut them down.
 
July 30, 2014 | NPR · Federal Reserve policymakers are announcing that the Fed plans to leave short-term interest rates at a level near zero. This, despite an economy that grew at a surprisingly strong 4 percent annual rate in the most recent quarter.
 

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July 26, 2014 | NPR · Hezbollah has been a longtime ally of Hamas, but during this most recent conflict between Israel and Gaza they've taken a sideline role. NPR's Scott Simon talks to the BBC's Kim Ghattas in Beirut.
 

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July 27, 2014 | NPR · Fighting in Ukraine near the crash site of Malaysia Airlines Flight MH17 has international investigators staying away. NPR's Arun Rath talks with OSCE's Michael Bociurkiw about the investigation.
 

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natural disasters

Jul 16, 2014 — Mass evacuations helped limit the death toll from Rammasun as it passed through densely populated areas. The government was better prepared following a killer storm last fall.
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Apr 29, 2014 — In a tornado, debris flung by high-speed winds can cause deadly injuries. A sturdy shelter is the best protection, but even lying in a ditch may save your life. Or putting on a bike helmet.
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Apr 19, 2014 — Search teams are digging through ice and snow on Mount Everest in hopes of finding Sherpa guides who are still missing. Survivors say the avalanche was like being trapped in a cloud.
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Mar 29, 2014 — The official death toll in the mudslide that turned a community into a disaster area in Oso, Wash., holds steady. And it seems a figure about damage done by landslides is nearly 30 years out of date.
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Nov 12, 2013 — As horrific as Haiyan has been, the disaster likely won't reach the same level of death and injury as the Indian Ocean tsunami of 2004 or Haiti's 2010 quake, disaster specialists say. Better communication systems in the disaster area are one reason why.
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Sep 17, 2013 — When politicians rise to the occasion during natural disasters, they're heroes. When they don't, it's hard for them to recover.
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Sep 13, 2013 — For decades, DNA has been used to identify victims of crime, even victims of war crimes. But there's no international standard for using DNA analysis for identifying bodies after a disaster. So some scholars are calling for an international group with the same reach as weapons inspectors.
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Jun 3, 2013 — In response to our coverage of the tornadoes, online comments have asked, "Why put yourself in the path of such disaster?" But Oklahoma residents have their reasons for staying put.
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Dec 5, 2012 — Rescuers are having trouble reaching many of those who were in the storm's path. Mud, fallen trees and downed electrical lines are in the way.
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Nov 5, 2012 — Steve Inskeep is a veteran reporter of wars and disasters with an appreciation for dark humor and the absurd. But how far can you go when you are the host of one of the largest general news shows in the country? Some listeners complained about his comments during coverage of Hurricane Sandy.
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