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August 1, 2014 | NPR · Renee Montagne talks with the head of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Dr. Thomas Frieden, for the latest news about the Ebola outbreak in West Africa.
 
August 1, 2014 | NPR · CIA director John Brennan apologized to Sen. Dianne Feinstein, who had accused the CIA of spying on her committee's computers. Brennan at first denied it.
 
August 1, 2014 | NPR · It's one of the most popular items, but often it seems to be as far as humanly possible from the entrance. The Planet Money team looks at two very different theories about why that is.
 

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July 31, 2014 | NPR · The day began with Israel's military calling up 16,000 more reservists, stoking fears of a widening offensive in Gaza; it ended with a 72-hour cease-fire agreement between Israel and Hamas.
 
July 31, 2014 | NPR · Nearly a month into the war in Gaza, pollsters have been taking a look at how attitudes in the region have changed among Israelis and Palestinians.
 
July 31, 2014 | NPR · A surge of new cases in West Africa's Ebola virus outbreak has health officials worried that the epidemic is getting worse. Sierra Leone, for one, has declared a state of emergency, sending in troops to quarantine some of the hardest hit communities.
 

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July 26, 2014 | NPR · Hezbollah has been a longtime ally of Hamas, but during this most recent conflict between Israel and Gaza they've taken a sideline role. NPR's Scott Simon talks to the BBC's Kim Ghattas in Beirut.
 

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July 27, 2014 | NPR · Fighting in Ukraine near the crash site of Malaysia Airlines Flight MH17 has international investigators staying away. NPR's Arun Rath talks with OSCE's Michael Bociurkiw about the investigation.
 

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Public Health

Jul 31, 2014 — Analysts say the merger of Reynolds American and Lorillard is driven by the changing demographics of smoking. But the lower smoking rate masks a more complex and varied pattern of cigarette usage.
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Jul 31, 2014 — Mummies from Ancient Egypt, Peru and the U.S. all show signs of hardened arteries. But why? Researchers say bad hygiene, open hearths and maybe some deeply ingrained genetic factors were to blame.
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Jul 18, 2014 — The mishaps mean federal scientists need to "take a hard look" at all federal research on deadly pathogens and make sure, in each case, that the benefits justify risks, says Dr. Tom Frieden.
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Jul 17, 2014 — Heading off to exotic locales to conduct research is one of the great joys of science. But many young scientists say they have been sexually harassed or assaulted by superiors while out there.
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Jul 11, 2014 — The sloppy handling by federal scientists of the world's scariest germs must stop, says the dismayed head of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Are his new rules enough?
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Jul 8, 2014 — Sure, we all forget stuff. But federal researchers apparently forgot vials of smallpox virus, perhaps for 60 years. The vials were rushed to a secure lab in Atlanta.
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Jul 7, 2014 — The tobacco industry played an influential role in the funding and popularization of stress research. A vast document archive details the relationships between cigarette makers and key scientists.
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Jul 3, 2014 — The deadliest Ebola outbreak in history continues to grow in West Africa. Even as health leaders met to figure out how to stop the virus, the number of cases surged by nearly 20 percent in a week.
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Jul 3, 2014 — It's called chikungunya. And it causes severe joint pain that can last for months. A quarter of a million people have caught the virus in the Caribbean. So how big a problem will it be stateside?
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Jul 2, 2014 — We know some people are more at risk for abusing alcohol than others. Now scientists say they're getting closer to predicting which teenagers are most at risk.
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