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April 17, 2014 | NPR · Scientists and food activists are launching a campaign to promote seeds that can be freely shared, rather than protected through patents and licenses. They call it the Open Source Seed Initiative.
 
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April 17, 2014 | NPR · A typical UPS truck now has hundreds of sensors on it. That's changing the way UPS drivers work — and it foreshadows changes coming for workers throughout the economy.
 
April 17, 2014 | NPR · Brazil is the spiritual home of soccer and a world powerhouse in the sport. It's woven into the Brazilian psyche. Wins and losses have had repercussions in other realms — including politics.
 

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April 16, 2014 | NPR · Ukrainian tanks arrived in the city of Kramatorsk Wednesday morning. By the time they rolled out of the city, they were flying Russian flags. People in Kramatorsk tell the story of what happened.
 
April 16, 2014 | NPR · NATO has announced a strengthening of its forces near the alliance's eastern border. Gen. George Joulwan, the former NATO supreme allied commander for Europe, discusses the plan.
 
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April 16, 2014 | NPR · A 325 million-year-old fossil find shows that the gill structures of modern sharks are actually quite different from their ancient ancestors.
 

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April 12, 2014 | NPR · As pro-Russia demonstrators continue their tense standoff in Eastern Ukraine, police are conspicuously absent from city streets.
 

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April 13, 2014 | NPR · As the anniversary of last year's marathon bombing approaches, NPR's Rachel Martin speaks with correspondent Carrie Johnson about the investigation and legal wrangling yet to come.
 

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Post Mortem: Death Investigation In America

Jan 4, 2013 — Ernie Lopez, whose conviction of sexually assaulting a 6-month-old girl was thrown out, accepted a plea deal in Amarillo, Texas, on Friday, in a move that avoids another trial. Lopez had served nine years in prison.
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Dec 21, 2012 — Kristian Aspelin had one thing in his favor: enough money to pay for medical experts. The experts were able to convince prosecutors that his infant son's death was an accident.
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Apr 6, 2012 — The California governor commuted the sentence of Shirley Ree Smith, who already served nearly a decade in prison, citing "significant doubts" that she killed her 7-week-old grandson.
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Mar 29, 2012 — Shirley Ree Smith, who was convicted of killing her 7-week-old grandson, faces a return to prison. But an investigation by NPR, ProPublica and PBS Frontline has found documents that raise new questions about the autopsy that sent her there.
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Mar 5, 2012 — After nine years in prison for sexual assault of a baby girl, Lopez has been reunited with his family in Texas. An investigation by NPR, Frontline and ProPublica showed that the baby had a disorder that mimicked the signs of physical abuse. And now, Lopez awaits a new trial.
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Jun 28, 2011 — NPR News Investigations, ProPublica and PBS Frontline analyzed nearly two dozen cases in which people have been accused of killing children based on flawed work by forensic pathologists. Some of the accused were later cleared, others like Ernie Lopez, remain in prison.
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Feb 1, 2011 — Did you know a coroner doesn't have to be a doctor to determine the cause of death? Learn more about investigating death in the U.S.
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Jun 30, 2011 — Tammy Marquardt is one of at least a dozen people prosecuted for killing children in Ontario based on what later turned out to be tainted medical evidence. In just the past few years, courts have overturned several of those convictions, and more are under review.
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Jan 26, 2012 — A joint investigation by NPR, Frontline and ProPublica cast doubt on Ernie Lopez's conviction. It found that oftentimes medical examiners and coroners mishandle cases of infant and child deaths.
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Jul 1, 2011 — A new study suggests that babies can die by violent shaking alone, but not in the way doctors have thought. A series of autopsies suggests damage to the neck rather than the brain can be fatal.
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