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August 1, 2014 | NPR · Renee Montagne talks with the head of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Dr. Thomas Frieden, for the latest news about the Ebola outbreak in West Africa.
 
August 1, 2014 | NPR · CIA director John Brennan apologized to Sen. Dianne Feinstein, who had accused the CIA of spying on her committee's computers. Brennan at first denied it.
 
August 1, 2014 | NPR · It's one of the most popular items, but often it seems to be as far as humanly possible from the entrance. The Planet Money team looks at two very different theories about why that is.
 

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July 31, 2014 | NPR · The day began with Israel's military calling up 16,000 more reservists, stoking fears of a widening offensive in Gaza; it ended with a 72-hour cease-fire agreement between Israel and Hamas.
 
July 31, 2014 | NPR · Nearly a month into the war in Gaza, pollsters have been taking a look at how attitudes in the region have changed among Israelis and Palestinians.
 
July 31, 2014 | NPR · A surge of new cases in West Africa's Ebola virus outbreak has health officials worried that the epidemic is getting worse. Sierra Leone, for one, has declared a state of emergency, sending in troops to quarantine some of the hardest hit communities.
 

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July 26, 2014 | NPR · Hezbollah has been a longtime ally of Hamas, but during this most recent conflict between Israel and Gaza they've taken a sideline role. NPR's Scott Simon talks to the BBC's Kim Ghattas in Beirut.
 

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July 27, 2014 | NPR · Fighting in Ukraine near the crash site of Malaysia Airlines Flight MH17 has international investigators staying away. NPR's Arun Rath talks with OSCE's Michael Bociurkiw about the investigation.
 

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bacteria

Jul 24, 2014 — Is this 2014 or 1348? The plague — yes, the infamous Black Death — was reported in China and Colorado. It's the same disease as the Middle Ages pandemic. Only now we know how to treat it.
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Jul 7, 2014 — To create accountability and transparency, some raw milk producers are coming up with guidelines for testing and safety. But federal agencies say all raw milk is still risky to consume.
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Mar 15, 2014 — Looks like the old adage about when it's safe to eat dropped foods may actually be effective for wet, sticky stuff like candies. For carpet-dusted snacks, you can take your sweet time, a study finds.
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Mar 5, 2014 — Removing bacteria and other impurities from water could be done more cheaply thanks to researchers at MIT. They're taking advantage of the way trees move water to filter it.
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Nov 25, 2013 — Making your own cheese and yogurt is all the rage these days. Now a scientist has taken the DIY craze to an entirely new level. She and an artist have made cheeses using the microcritters on their own skin, as well as those from famous folks. The curds are on display at a museum.
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Nov 18, 2013 — Anxious mice calm down when they get an infusion of gut microbes from mellow mice. That has scientists wondering if gut microbes play a role in the human brain, too. Research on that is only just beginning. But it's intriguing to think there could be a real truth to the phrase "gut feelings."
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Nov 8, 2013 — It may be possible to cultivate a healthier community of bacteria on and inside us by modifying our diet. For starters, eating more vegetables probably won't hurt.
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Nov 6, 2013 — Parents of new babies know they get sick a lot. That may be because infants deliberately suppress their immune systems so that essential microbes have a chance to settle in. An immune suppression system in the blood of newborn babies could be key to building a healthy microbiome.
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Nov 4, 2013 — Scientists are asking people to contribute samples of their gut microbes to help figure out how those microbes affect human health. But ethicists say sharing that information, as well as the personal health data that make it useful to researchers, poses risks. That's especially true for children.
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Sep 18, 2013 — Science may seem advanced, may even be advanced, but that doesn't mean there aren't still plenty of questions left to ask and answer. A new book catalogs 20 of the biggest questions outstanding. Physicist Marcelo Gleiser looks the list over and ponders some of the subjects keeping scientists awake at night.
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