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September 1, 2014 | NPR · A Guinean student in the Senegalese capital of Dakar has tested positive for the deadly disease. David Greene talks to Krista Larson, West Africa correspondent for the Associated Press.
 
September 1, 2014 | NPR · Protesters surrounded Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif's home, and for a brief period forced government TV off the air. Steve Inskeep talks to Jon Boone, a correspondent for The Guardian in Islamabad.
 
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September 1, 2014 | NPR · A widely watched video shows a foreigner fainting on a subway car and everyone around him fleeing. No one helps. It's rekindled a national debate about trust, fear and the Chinese national character.
 

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September 1, 2014 | NPR · Ebola has exposed weaknesses in Africa's health networks and a failure to work together to arrest the spread of the virus. The "not our problem" response is taking an economic toll on the continent.
 
September 1, 2014 | NPR · Nearly 260 health workers in West Africa have been infected, and 134 have died. Dr. Robert Garry of Tulane University, who worked with five who died, discusses the devastation in the community.
 
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September 1, 2014 | NPR · Ads with candidates shooting guns are proliferating this year. It can all be traced back to Sen. Joe Manchin's famed 2010 spot "Dead Aim."
 

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August 30, 2014 | NPR · Ukrainian forces are defending the port city of Novoazovsk from what they say is a Russian invasion. Scott Simon talks to correspondent Soraya Sarhaddi Nelson.
 

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August 31, 2014 | NPR · Immigration remains one of the most challenging issues for President Obama. Political correspondent Mara Liasson discusses the political cost of the choices before him with Linda Wertheimer.
 

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Science

May 21, 2013 — Engineers have figured out a way to get crystals to form rose and tulip sculptures, each smaller than a strand of hair. The gardens sprout up on a penny dipped in a salt solution. The technique is similar to 3-D printing and could one day be used to make any complex shape.
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Feb 20, 2013 — Satellites help track storms, power the GPS signals in our cars and phones and beam TV signals around the world. But they also send back striking, totally disarming images of planet Earth.
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Dec 27, 2012 — NASA's Curiosity rover turned its camera around and captured a beautiful self-portrait from Gale Crater.
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Dec 5, 2012 — "The night is nowhere as dark as we might think," says one scientist. How does your location light up the night?
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Aug 23, 2012 — For the past century, the Forest Service has been sending photographers out to the same 13 points in Bitterroot National Forest in Montana every decade or so. The resulting photo series shows just how dynamic our forests really are.
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Aug 11, 2012 — Could crowd-sourced photo sharing be the future of taxonomy? Cybertaxonomy?
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Oct 25, 2011 — Some 73 million sharks are killed each year for their fins. Despite increased public awareness, large-scale operations are still open for business in many countries, new images show.
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Oct 12, 2011 — Park rangers thwart poachers' plans to sell a baby gorilla in the Democratic Republic of Congo. Now, caretakers are watching little Shamavu around the clock.
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Oct 6, 2011 — The 2011 British Wildlife Photography Awards feature the U.K.'s resident animals as they roam their terrain and swim in their waters.
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Sep 28, 2011 — A rare, yellow hypergiant star has been photographed by researchers at the European Southern Observatory. The burning ball of gas is rapidly dying, just 13,000 light-years away from us.
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