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April 16, 2014 | NPR · Schoolgirls were kidnapped in Nigeria Tuesday. The suspects are believed to be with a radical group blamed for a bombing Monday. Kelly McEvers talks to Michelle Faul of The Associated Press.
 
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April 16, 2014 | NPR · Fans and foes want to know whether the Affordable Care Act is meeting its goals. But, for good reasons, there are no clear answers yet.
 
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April 16, 2014 | NPR · A year after the Boston Marathon bombing, Heather Abbott has adapted to life with her prostheses, including a blade for running and one that allows her to wear her favorite shoes.
 

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April 15, 2014 | NPR · One year has passed since bombs rocked the finish line of the Boston Marathon. The city honored victims of the tragedy Tuesday with a tribute, including speeches from three of the victims themselves.
 
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April 15, 2014 | WBUR · At last year's Boston Marathon, Carol Downing was just half a mile from the finish line when bombs exploded and injured two of her daughters. This year, she's returning to complete the race.
 
April 15, 2014 | NPR · Each April, the shad come back to the Delaware River to spawn, and thousands of anglers in New Jersey and Pennsylvania eagerly await them. Celebrating their annual return is a local spring tradition.
 

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April 12, 2014 | NPR · As pro-Russia demonstrators continue their tense standoff in Eastern Ukraine, police are conspicuously absent from city streets.
 

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April 13, 2014 | NPR · As the anniversary of last year's marathon bombing approaches, NPR's Rachel Martin speaks with correspondent Carrie Johnson about the investigation and legal wrangling yet to come.
 

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Ray LaHood

Jan 29, 2013 — As expected, the Senate Foreign Relations Committee supports the nomination of Sen. John Kerry, D-Mass., to succeed Secretary Hillary Clinton. Meanwhile, Transportation Secretary Ray Lahood is the latest member of the administration to announce a departure.
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Jan 23, 2013 — Ray LaHood says the FAA is in the "business of doing a top to bottom review" and they will let them finish their job. The FAA grounded all of Boeing's 787 Dreamliners to investigate their lithium batteries.
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Feb 29, 2012 — The Americans include Sam LaHood, son of Transportation Secretary Ray LaHood. The younger man runs the U.S. government-sponsored International Republican Institute in Egypt.
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Feb 8, 2012 — Authorities have shut some foreign groups, including ones run by Americans, because of what they say may be the organizations' support of protesters. Among those prevented from leaving is the son of U.S. Transportation Secretary Ray LaHood.
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Jan 27, 2012 — The son of Transportation Secretary Ray LaHood has been prevented from leaving the country. He and others who work for foreign groups are under suspicion of supporting anti-government protesters — a charge he says is "patently false."
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Jan 26, 2012 — Egyptian authorities' efforts to prevent organizations that promote democracy from freely working inside their country have now ensnared the son of a U.S. cabinet secretary.
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Apr 19, 2011 — The governments of some countries, including Japan and Germany, allow controllers to nap during their breaks. Transportation Secretary Ray LaHood says that's not going to happen on his watch.
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Apr 14, 2011 — There have now been at least five incidents. The FAA has ordered changes in staffing, and Transportation Secretary Ray LaHood says his agency "will not sleep until we can guarantee that there's good safety in the control towers."
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Mar 8, 2011 — "We believe that we got it right," Secretary Ray LaHood told NPR. "And airlines recognize it's a rule they can live with."
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