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September 2, 2014 | NPR · At a Labor Day picnic in Milwaukee, the president accused the GOP of blocking economic initiatives. He urged the sympathetic union audience to turn their frustration into political action in November.
 
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September 2, 2014 | NPR · The city's plan to restructure its debt has been praised as a creative way to protect both pensioners and its art museum. But some creditors — and residents — feel like they're being railroaded.
 
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September 2, 2014 | NPR · A company called WTAS is reviving the defunct accounting firm's name and hoping clients have forgotten its associations with the Enron scandal.
 

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September 2, 2014 | NPR · The Islamist extremist group Islamic State has released a new video that purports to show the beheading of an American journalist named Steven Sotloff. Two weeks ago, the group threatened to kill Sotloff in a video depicting the beheading of James Foley, another American journalist.
 
September 2, 2014 | NPR · In response to unrest in eastern Ukraine, NATO is considering forming a rapid reaction force — a topic that will be discussed at a summit this week in Wales. But how will Russia react, and is this the right move for the alliance? To learn more, Audie Cornish speaks with Steven Pifer, the director of Arms Control and Non-Proliferation Initiative at the Brookings Institution.
 
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September 2, 2014 | NPR · The Pentagon has been transferring mine-resistant, ambush-protected vehicles to local police. Built to protect U.S. forces from roadside bomb blasts at war, these huge vehicles aren't always welcome.
 

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August 30, 2014 | NPR · Ukrainian forces are defending the port city of Novoazovsk from what they say is a Russian invasion. Scott Simon talks to correspondent Soraya Sarhaddi Nelson.
 

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August 31, 2014 | NPR · Immigration remains one of the most challenging issues for President Obama. Political correspondent Mara Liasson discusses the political cost of the choices before him with Linda Wertheimer.
 

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Japan's Nuclear Crisis: Science

Mar 31, 2011 — A timeline of the nuclear disaster at the Fukushima Dai-ichi plant, which has leaked radiation since it was damaged by the March 11 earthquake and tsunami.
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Jul 25, 2013 — Water in all its forms has caused trouble at the ruined Fukushima nuclear plant this week. They are reminders that the problems are far from over.
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Feb 28, 2012 — A small group of engineers, soldiers and firemen risked their own lives to help prevent a complete meltdown after the quake and tsunami hit. Investigative reporter Dan Edge chronicles the aftermath of the disaster in a new Frontline documentary.
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Jun 20, 2011 — In new reports, the International Atomic Energy Agency and the Japanese government highlight the hazardous working conditions, lack of communication and last-ditch efforts by workers to contain meltdowns at the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant in Japan. Early confusion among the leadership was also a problem.
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Apr 12, 2011 — Though Fukushima and Chernobyl are both level 7 nuclear accidents, the consequences in Japan to date are much less severe. In part, that's because far more radiation was released at Chernobyl.
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Apr 12, 2011 — The Japanese government raised its assessment of the crisis at Japan's stricken Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant to the highest possible level. And it could take more than 10 years and $10 billion to clean it up. Though engineers know how to handle the basic operations, nobody's ever tried a nuclear cleanup on this scale before.
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Apr 7, 2011 — The violent shaking from Japan's March 11 earthquake stirred up the soil, leading to broken water pipes, tilted utility poles and manholes that popped out of the ground. The phenomenon, known as liquefaction, was particularly noticeable in areas built on land reclaimed from the sea.
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Apr 6, 2011 — Experts say that in the weeks following the series of explosions and fires inside the reactors at the Fukushima Dai-ichi power plant, TEPCO made very costly — and avoidable — mistakes. The company, they say, was deeply surprised and overwhelmed by the course of events.
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Apr 5, 2011 — "Safe" isn't a defined engineering term. Planners must decide, based on risks and probabilities, how safe they want to make something — whether it's an airplane, bridge, or nuclear power plant. But sometimes it's hard to estimate exactly what the likelihood of a particular calamity might be.
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Mar 24, 2011 — The shadowy, grainy images bring home in a visceral way the challenges that workers at the Fukushima Dai-ichi plant face, including the very basic obstacle of working in the dark.
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