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April 23, 2014 | NPR · They say they were placed on the list for refusing to inform on other Muslims. The suit is part of a broad wave of cases challenging the secretive no-fly list and U.S. counterterrorism strategies.
 
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April 23, 2014 | NPR · For decades, a mysterious quacking "bio-duck" has been heard roaming the waters of the Southern Ocean. Now scientists say the source is a whale.
 

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April 19, 2014 | NPR · The search continues for hundreds of people, mostly students, who were on board a South Korean ferry when it sank this week. Correspondent Anthony Kuhn shares the latest with NPR's Wade Goodwyn.
 

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Japan's Nuclear Crisis: Health

Mar 9, 2012 — Experts say health effects from the radiation released by last year's nuclear disaster will be minimal. But the lasting psychological trauma from the tsunami, including the loss of life and livelihoods, will be an ongoing struggle.
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Feb 28, 2012 — A small group of engineers, soldiers and firemen risked their own lives to help prevent a complete meltdown after the quake and tsunami hit. Investigative reporter Dan Edge chronicles the aftermath of the disaster in a new Frontline documentary.
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Apr 5, 2011 — Concerns about radiation contamination have caused prices for fish and seaweed to fall sharply in Japan. How founded are these fears? One Japanese expert on marine radioecology says he's still eating fish.
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Apr 1, 2011 — Within hours of learning of damage to the Japanese nuclear power plant, a team of physicians and radiation health experts sprang into action. They've been treating injured workers and providing expert advice to the Japanese public about radiation risks.
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Mar 31, 2011 — The FDA found a small amount of radioactive iodine in milk from Spokane, Wash., but experts and officials agree that the amount is far from dangerous. If anything, the news is just evidence that U.S. detection equipment is pretty darn sensitive, one expert says.
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Mar 30, 2011 — We've heard about radiation from the damaged nuclear reactors in Japan reaching U.S. shores. Professor Peter Caracappa, of the Rensselaer Polytenchic Institute, talks to Renee Montagne about different types of radiation people encounter and how to weigh the risks.
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Mar 24, 2011 — A leading radiation researcher in Japan says it will be tough to study health effects from the Fukushima accident in the population at large. The doses are likely to be small and very difficult to estimate.
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Mar 23, 2011 — The warning that Tokyo's tap water contains twice as much radioactive iodine as allowed for infants strikes a particularly distressing chord. And the shortage of bottled water there compounds the anxiety for mothers of formula-fed babies. An expert on radiation offers some practical advice.
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Mar 22, 2011 — Early indications suggest most of the radiation released comes from iodine-131 — and that decays quickly, with a half-life of just eight days. That means that over the course of two or three months, virtually all of the radiation should be gone.
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Mar 21, 2011 Reports of radiation-contaminated food in Japan have raised concerns. Here's a reality check: At the highest radioactivity levels detected so far, you'd have to drink an 8-ounce glass every day for 160 years to raise your lifetime risk of getting cancer by 4 percent.
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