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April 18, 2014 | NPR · The agreement calls on all parties to refrain from violence, requires that illegally-armed groups disarm and that control of government buildings be returned to Ukrainian authorities.
 
April 18, 2014 | NPR · President Obama said enrollment under the Affordable Care Act reached 8 million after the deadline was extended by 2 weeks. The figure represents a turnaround from the disastrous debut of the website.
 
April 18, 2014 | NPR · Morning Edition spent a lot of time recently reporting from the U.S.-Mexico border. President Obama has deported 2 million people from the U.S. But many say that number is misleading.
 

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April 18, 2014 | NPR · It looks as though the "comment period" for the controversial Keystone XL pipeline project will be extended, delaying a decision past the November elections.
 
April 18, 2014 | NPR · Regular political commentators, E.J. Dionne of The Washington Post and David Brooks of The New York Times, discuss the breakthrough Ukraine deal and the new health care enrollment numbers.
 
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April 18, 2014 | NPR · Ivan Soltesz studies epilepsy in mice, but says children with chronic seizures are his inspiration. He's closing in on a way to quell the seizures with light — and without drugs' side effects.
 

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April 12, 2014 | NPR · As pro-Russia demonstrators continue their tense standoff in Eastern Ukraine, police are conspicuously absent from city streets.
 

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April 13, 2014 | NPR · As the anniversary of last year's marathon bombing approaches, NPR's Rachel Martin speaks with correspondent Carrie Johnson about the investigation and legal wrangling yet to come.
 

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Kee Facts: A Few Things You Didn't Know

Dec 30, 2012 — As the year comes to an end, NPR librarian Kee Malesky shares closing lines from some great novels — those last few moments spent with a story that you love.
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Nov 25, 2012 — In all of American history, just one woman has ever been awarded the Medal of Honor: Mary Edwards Walker, a physician during the Civil War. Congress later tried to take back the medal, but she refused to return it.
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Oct 20, 2012 — He's legend now, but the man was as odd as his myth. Long-haired, barefoot and nature-loving, John Chapman traveled the Midwest in the early 1800s planting trees and creating orchards for future settlers.
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Sep 15, 2012 — In mid-September 1862, the Army of Northern Virginia and the Army of the Potomac clashed on the banks of Antietam Creek, just outside Sharpsburg, Md., in a battle that became the nation's bloodiest day. Two photographers documented the carnage in an unprecedented series of "death studies."
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Aug 11, 2012 — Slice, hook, eagle, birdie, bogey, putt. Golf's top pros are in the final rounds of the 2012 PGA Championship this weekend in South Carolina, so let's take a look at the fascinating history of one fundamental piece of equipment.
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Jul 28, 2012 — The International Olympic Committee came up with some rather unusual sporting events for the 1900 Paris Games — including one that would probably be considered shocking today.
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Jun 16, 2012 — Deep Throat whispered "follow the money" to reporter Bob Woodward during the investigation of Watergate, the third-rate burglary that brought down the Nixon administration. Or did he? An NPR librarian launched her own investigation.
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May 6, 2012 — From Gauls to Goths to soldiers of the Holy Roman Empire, many outsiders have tried to destroy the Eternal City, with varying degrees of success. Rome has been defended repeatedly, by courageous fighters and once by a flock of geese. May 6 is the anniversary of the last and most devastating sacking of Rome.
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Dec 24, 2011 — Billions of brilliant lights sparkle on houses and trees around the nation as people celebrate the Christmas season. Those lights have also given American presidents reason to joyfully flip the switch on the national tree for nearly 90 years.
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Oct 9, 2011 — It's time to celebrate millimeters, kilograms, liters and hectares! it's National Metric Week, and the U.S. stands almost alone in its lack of affection for the Système international d'unités. Serious repercussions have resulted; just ask NASA about their Mars Orbiter.
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