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July 25, 2014 | NPR · Steve Inskeep talks with Honduran Foreign Minister Mireya Aguero de Corrales, who's in Washington to help find a solution to the thousands of Central American children arriving at the U.S. border.
 
July 25, 2014 | WBUR · Massachusetts is offering to house hundreds of unaccompanied minors who've been detained crossing the U.S.-Mexico border. One of the proposed sites is on Cape Cod, but residents are blasting the plan.
 
July 25, 2014 | NPR · The novels of John le Carre have been reliable sources of compelling cinema. The new adaptation of "A Most Wanted Man" stars Philip Seymour Hoffman in one of his last roles.
 

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July 25, 2014 | NPR · Central American presidents met with President Obama, discussing the influx of unaccompanied children crossing the border. So far, Obama has not seen eye to eye with Congress on possible solutions.
 
July 25, 2014 | NPR · Regular political commentators, E.J. Dionne of The Washington Post and David Brooks of The New York Times, discuss U.S. policy options in the Gaza Strip and Rep. Paul Ryan's anti-poverty plan.
 
July 25, 2014 | NPR · Sayed Kashua is an Arab who writes novels in Hebrew and a sitcom in Arabic. A contradiction? Maybe. But his newest book is a good look at an often-overlooked segment of the Israeli population.
 

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July 19, 2014 | NPR · NPR's Scott Simon talks with David Herzsenhorn of The New York Times about the latest developments in Ukraine, where a Malaysia Airlines passenger plane was downed on Thursday, killing 298 people.
 

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July 20, 2014 | NPR · NPR's Arun Rath gets the latest from correspondent Corey Flintoff at the site of last week's downing of a Malaysian jetliner in Eastern Ukraine.
 

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Kee Facts: A Few Things You Didn't Know

Dec 30, 2012 — As the year comes to an end, NPR librarian Kee Malesky shares closing lines from some great novels — those last few moments spent with a story that you love.
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Nov 25, 2012 — In all of American history, just one woman has ever been awarded the Medal of Honor: Mary Edwards Walker, a physician during the Civil War. Congress later tried to take back the medal, but she refused to return it.
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Oct 20, 2012 — He's legend now, but the man was as odd as his myth. Long-haired, barefoot and nature-loving, John Chapman traveled the Midwest in the early 1800s planting trees and creating orchards for future settlers.
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Sep 15, 2012 — In mid-September 1862, the Army of Northern Virginia and the Army of the Potomac clashed on the banks of Antietam Creek, just outside Sharpsburg, Md., in a battle that became the nation's bloodiest day. Two photographers documented the carnage in an unprecedented series of "death studies."
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Aug 11, 2012 — Slice, hook, eagle, birdie, bogey, putt. Golf's top pros are in the final rounds of the 2012 PGA Championship this weekend in South Carolina, so let's take a look at the fascinating history of one fundamental piece of equipment.
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Jul 28, 2012 — The International Olympic Committee came up with some rather unusual sporting events for the 1900 Paris Games — including one that would probably be considered shocking today.
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Jun 16, 2012 — Deep Throat whispered "follow the money" to reporter Bob Woodward during the investigation of Watergate, the third-rate burglary that brought down the Nixon administration. Or did he? An NPR librarian launched her own investigation.
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May 6, 2012 — From Gauls to Goths to soldiers of the Holy Roman Empire, many outsiders have tried to destroy the Eternal City, with varying degrees of success. Rome has been defended repeatedly, by courageous fighters and once by a flock of geese. May 6 is the anniversary of the last and most devastating sacking of Rome.
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Dec 24, 2011 — Billions of brilliant lights sparkle on houses and trees around the nation as people celebrate the Christmas season. Those lights have also given American presidents reason to joyfully flip the switch on the national tree for nearly 90 years.
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Oct 9, 2011 — It's time to celebrate millimeters, kilograms, liters and hectares! it's National Metric Week, and the U.S. stands almost alone in its lack of affection for the Système international d'unités. Serious repercussions have resulted; just ask NASA about their Mars Orbiter.
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