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April 18, 2014 | NPR · The agreement calls on all parties to refrain from violence, requires that illegally-armed groups disarm and that control of government buildings be returned to Ukrainian authorities.
 
April 18, 2014 | NPR · President Obama said enrollment under the Affordable Care Act reached 8 million after the deadline was extended by 2 weeks. The figure represents a turnaround from the disastrous debut of the website.
 
April 18, 2014 | NPR · Morning Edition spent a lot of time recently reporting from the U.S.-Mexico border. President Obama has deported 2 million people from the U.S. But many say that number is misleading.
 

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April 18, 2014 | NPR · It looks as though the "comment period" for the controversial Keystone XL pipeline project will be extended, delaying a decision past the November elections.
 
April 18, 2014 | NPR · Regular political commentators, E.J. Dionne of The Washington Post and David Brooks of The New York Times, discuss the breakthrough Ukraine deal and the new health care enrollment numbers.
 
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April 18, 2014 | NPR · Ivan Soltesz studies epilepsy in mice, but says children with chronic seizures are his inspiration. He's closing in on a way to quell the seizures with light — and without drugs' side effects.
 

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April 19, 2014 | NPR · The search continues for hundreds of people, mostly students, who were on board a South Korean ferry when it sank this week. Correspondent Anthony Kuhn shares the latest with NPR's Wade Goodwyn.
 

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April 13, 2014 | NPR · As the anniversary of last year's marathon bombing approaches, NPR's Rachel Martin speaks with correspondent Carrie Johnson about the investigation and legal wrangling yet to come.
 

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Radio Pictures

Apr 25, 2011 — Magdalene is a two-year residential program in Nashville, Tenn., for women with criminal histories of addiction and prostitution. There's therapy, and they also make bath oils and candles, products that its founder — a former Episcopal priest — say promote healing. The message is: Love heals.
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May 19, 2011 — Roughly 1 in 3 adult Americans is now obese. And ground zero for the nation's obesity battle is Mississippi — where 7 of 10 adults in the state are either overweight or obese. The problem is most pronounced in Holmes County — the poorest and heaviest in the state.
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May 3, 2011 — The soldiers at Combat Outpost Charkh in Afghanistan's Logar province have seen some of the fiercest combat of the war in the past six months. They say they have made gains, but the insurgent attacks still come every evening, like clockwork.
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Aug 16, 2012 — Specialty roasters increasingly are working directly with coffee growers around the world to produce coffees as varied in taste as wines. They're teaching their clientele to appreciate the subtle characteristics of brews by bringing cupping, an age-old ritual once limited to coffee insiders, to the coffee-sipping masses.
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Apr 2, 2012 — Thiamine mononitrate, disodium inosinate and pyridoxine hydrochloride are just a few of the hard-to-pronounce ingredients in a typical school lunch burger. But some schools are phasing processed food out and are bringing scratch cooking back to their kitchens.
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Feb 24, 2012 — When sick people search the Web for remedies or tweet about their symptoms, they're sending an early warning signal about disease outbreaks. Now scientists and public health officials are listening in.
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Oct 31, 2011 — The U.N. says today symbolically marks the moment when the world's population reaches 7 billion. A little more than two centuries ago, the global population was 1 billion. How did it grow so big so fast? With the help of a sound montage and video, it gets a bit easier to see how the Earth can produce that kind of a crowd.
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Oct 10, 2011 — Imagine the U.S. government saying to the people living around Yellowstone, "You know what? All those wild animals in the park — the grizzlies, the bison, the wolves — they belong to you." This is exactly what the government of Namibia has done in a radical experiment to save wildlife — and the people who share their land.
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Sep 29, 2011 — The pawpaw is a tropical-type fruit native to North America with a long and almost forgotten history. Thomas Jefferson once prized it, and now scientists are looking at whether the pawpaw can claim some health benefits, along with cachet. NPR's Tiny Desk Kitchen goes on the hunt for this tasty treat.
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Sep 28, 2011 — Joseph Guillotin, Henry Shrapnel and Jules Leotard became immortal — by entering the English language. But when your entire life is reduced to a single definition, the results are sometimes upsetting.
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