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August 22, 2014 | NPR · The standoff between the U.S. and Russia over Ukraine has raised the specter of a new Cold War. David Greene talks to Julie Ioffe, of the New Republic, about what Russia's next move may be in Ukraine.
 
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August 22, 2014 | NPR · Even just the word Ebola is kind of terrifying. Why? Hollywood has a lot to do with it. But Ebola outbreaks also have all the ingredients for what one psychologist calls the "dread factor."
 
August 22, 2014 | NPR · Census Bureau data show a wider gap between rich and poor. Kelly McEvers explores this with economist Enrico Moretti of the University of California-Berkeley, author of The New Geography of Jobs.
 

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August 22, 2014 | NPR · It's been another rough August for President Obama. He's wrapping up a summer vacation marred by events in Ferguson, Mo., and the murder of an American journalist in the Middle East.
 
August 22, 2014 | NPR · Regular political commentators, E.J. Dionne of The Washington Post and Reihan Salam of The National Review, discuss the killing of American journalist James Foley and the ongoing conflict in Ferguson, Mo.
 
August 22, 2014 | NPR · The scent of fresh pencils is in the air, and homework assignments are around the corner. In honor of back-to-school season, author Alexander Aciman recommends The Lost Estate by Henri Alain-Fournier.
 

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August 23, 2014 | NPR · Nearly 1,500 people have died in West Africa's Ebola epidemic. Meanwhile, more nations in the region are closing their borders. NPR's Scott Simon speaks to correspondent Ofeibea Quist-Arcton.
 

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August 17, 2014 | NPR · American fighter jets and drones carried out airstrikes against Islamist targets near the Mosul Dam in northern Iraq on Saturday. A breach of the dam could threaten entire cities.
 

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All Things Considered for May 17, 2011

May 17, 2011 — Unlike the friendly but fictional food faces of Betty Crocker, Aunt Jemima and Uncle Ben, Chef Boyardee — that jovial, mustachioed Italian chef — is real. His great-niece, Anna Boiardi, shares family recipes and stories in her new book, Delicious Memories.
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May 17, 2011 — A program at the University of Tennessee asks songwriters to write music and lyrics to help break down the intimidating jargon of advanced science.
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May 17, 2011 — This week, more than 500 journalists are descending on Orlando, Fla., for the start of the murder trial of Casey Anthony, 25, who is accused of killing her 2-year-old daughter, Caylee. Prosecutors are seeking the death penalty. The trial is attracting so much attention that the judge says it could rival the O.J. Simpson trial for media saturation.
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May 17, 2011 — Larry Kramer's unflinching autobiographical play — written in 1985 and set in the early days of the AIDS crisis among a community of gay men in New York City — has been revived on Broadway, but Kramer himself isn't looking back.
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May 17, 2011 — California is looking at a windfall. State revenues are up well beyond projections — $6.5 billion more than expected. Gov. Jerry Brown wants to use the money to stem proposed education cuts. But he also wants to move forward with his proposed tax increases.
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May 17, 2011 — Our Lady of Guadalupe has mysteriously appeared beneath a viaduct near the ocean in Encinitas, Calif. The 10 foot by 10 foot brightly colored mosaic of the Virgin riding a surfboard is intricate and beautiful. The problem is that the piece is illegal and the mayor says it "qualifies for graffiti."
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May 17, 2011 — Not one of Germany's top 100 companies has a female CEO, and women make up only 2.2 percent of their executive boards. Some businesswomen and legislators have proposed a quota system to remedy the imbalance, but some feel Germany's corporate culture isn't ready to join countries like France in embracing quotas.
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May 17, 2011 — Tennessee's Those Darlins hooked up at the Southern Girls Rock 'n' Roll Camp, which bassist Kelley Darlin founded in 2003. Critic Robert Christgau is glad to see the band finally playing rock, as well.
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May 17, 2011 — Legendary Minnesota Twins Hall of Famer Harmon Killebrew died Tuesday, ending his battle with esophageal cancer. Killebrew was a top power hitter in the 1960s. And he helped the fledgling Twins put down roots in a place that until 1961 had never had a major league team.
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Apr 13, 2011 — English is definitely changing, but whether it's declining or evolving depends on who — ahem, whom — you ask. Writer Robert Lane Greene recommends three books about what it means to speak and write "well" — when the definition of "well" is a moving target.
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more All Things Considered for May 17, 2011 from NPR