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August 21, 2014 | NPR · The attorney general hugged community leaders, a highway patrol captain and the mother of Michael Brown during his visit, and got an update on the federal investigation into the teen's shooting.
 
August 21, 2014 | NPR · At McCluer High School, 30 varsity football players — all black, mostly from Ferguson — practice. David Greene talks to Sports Illustrated writer Robert Klemko about his story, "Football in Ferguson."
 
August 21, 2014 | NPR · Kelly McEvers talks to Syria expert Shashank Joshi, about President Bashar al-Assad's tenacious grip on power. Joshi is with the Royal Services Institute in London.
 

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August 21, 2014 | NPR · The aftermath of the police shooting in Ferguson, Mo., has focused attention on police-involved killings more broadly in the U.S. But statistics on shootings by police are scarce. To learn why, Audie Cornish speaks with David Klinger, an associate professor at the University of Missouri in St. Louis.
 
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August 21, 2014 | NPR · The hunt is on to identify the man in the James Foley execution video who speaks with a British accent. An estimated 2,000 Europeans have left home to join the Islamic State in Syria and Iraq.
 
August 21, 2014 | NPR · An Israeli airstrike killed three Hamas military commanders, who were buried shortly later amid threats that the militant group would respond.
 

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August 16, 2014 | NPR · Both Ukraine and Russia say they're trying to send supplies to residents in eastern Ukraine. But with tensions on both sides running high, that aid may take a while to arrive.
 

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August 17, 2014 | NPR · American fighter jets and drones carried out airstrikes against Islamist targets near the Mosul Dam in northern Iraq on Saturday. A breach of the dam could threaten entire cities.
 

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Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Aug 15, 2014 — The WHO has called for donations to help contain the outbreak. But money is just the first step. The challenges run from finding the right staff to prepping neighboring countries just in case.
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Jul 12, 2014 — The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention will close the laboratories after last month's possible exposure of dozens of workers to anthrax and the discovery of a vial of smallpox this week.
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Jun 20, 2014 — The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention increased to 86 the number of its personnel who it says may have been exposed to live anthrax at three labs in Atlanta.
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Jun 19, 2014 — The live anthrax bacteria may have become airborne as lab workers were transferring it from one facility to another without following the correct procedure for rendering it inert, the CDC says.
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Nov 16, 2013 — There have been seven cases of bacterial meningitis on the university's campus since March. The FDA has given approval to importing a European vaccine because the strain detected at Princeton isn't covered by vaccines available in the U.S. The severe disease can cause serious complications or death.
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May 23, 2013 — A trend that was interrupted in 2006 and 2007 has resumed: Fewer girls are getting pregnant.
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Apr 5, 2013 — The number of kids with dangerous levels of lead in their blood hasn't declined much in the past decade, as the government has remained focused on managing lead-based paint. Now researchers argue that more attention to contaminated soil is needed to prevent lead poisoning.
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Mar 14, 2013 — Nearly 70 percent of American drivers say they talked on their cell phones while driving at least once in the previous month, according to a survey by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. And about a third admitted to reading or sending texts or emails while driving.
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Feb 22, 2013 — Dozens of kids get sick after a seemingly innocent birthday party. Was it the homemade ice cream or an accident in the pool? A new iPad app lets you solve outbreak puzzles just like real disease detectives. It's pleasing entertainment, if not as infectious as real video games.
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May 19, 2011 — Zombies seem to be a popular subject for researchers who want us to be prepared for disasters and plagues.
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