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April 18, 2014 | NPR · The agreement calls on all parties to refrain from violence, requires that illegally-armed groups disarm and that control of government buildings be returned to Ukrainian authorities.
 
April 18, 2014 | NPR · President Obama said enrollment under the Affordable Care Act reached 8 million after the deadline was extended by 2 weeks. The figure represents a turnaround from the disastrous debut of the website.
 
April 18, 2014 | NPR · Morning Edition spent a lot of time recently reporting from the U.S.-Mexico border. President Obama has deported 2 million people from the U.S. But many say that number is misleading.
 

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April 18, 2014 | NPR · It looks as though the "comment period" for the controversial Keystone XL pipeline project will be extended, delaying a decision past the November elections.
 
April 18, 2014 | NPR · Regular political commentators, E.J. Dionne of The Washington Post and David Brooks of The New York Times, discuss the breakthrough Ukraine deal and the new health care enrollment numbers.
 
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April 18, 2014 | NPR · Ivan Soltesz studies epilepsy in mice, but says children with chronic seizures are his inspiration. He's closing in on a way to quell the seizures with light — and without drugs' side effects.
 

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April 19, 2014 | NPR · The search continues for hundreds of people, mostly students, who were on board a South Korean ferry when it sank this week. Correspondent Anthony Kuhn shares the latest with NPR's Wade Goodwyn.
 

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April 13, 2014 | NPR · As the anniversary of last year's marathon bombing approaches, NPR's Rachel Martin speaks with correspondent Carrie Johnson about the investigation and legal wrangling yet to come.
 

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public health

Feb 12, 2014 — Most people who are infected with West Nile virus never get sick. But some of those who do can wind up in the hospital, or suffer permanent disability. A Texas outbreak in 2012 may have made West Nile one of the more costly diseases in the state that year.
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Sep 19, 2013 — People who show up wounded at a hospital often don't tell police. When a hospital in Cardiff, Wales, shared that information without naming names, the toll of violence dropped, and the city saved $11 million a year on health care and policing. Other British cities are adopting the program.
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Sep 16, 2013 — If obesity were a disease, would you be more likely to seek medical help because insurance would pay for treatment? Or would you feel stigmatized and just give up? That's the debate surrounding increased efforts to classify obesity as a disease.
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Sep 13, 2013 — For decades, DNA has been used to identify victims of crime, even victims of war crimes. But there's no international standard for using DNA analysis for identifying bodies after a disaster. So some scholars are calling for an international group with the same reach as weapons inspectors.
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Aug 28, 2013 — State and local public health departments are turning to apps as to help them reach people when they need help the most. Birth control finders, recipe tweakers and searchable restaurant inspections are in the mix.
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Jun 3, 2013 — Tuberculosis is much less of a health threat in the United States than it is in other countries. But a family in Boston discovered that even here, no one is immune from this ancient foe. More than a dozen family members were infected with TB, and matriarch Judy Williams died at age 59.
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Mar 5, 2013 — People don't mind new laws telling them how to eat, as long as they feel like they're not being coerced. That's the finding of a new study from the Harvard School of Public Health, which took the unusual step of asking people what they thought about government efforts to encourage healthy eating.
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Jan 28, 2013 — Public health expert Derek Yach surprised nutrition advocates when he joined PepsiCo six years ago. He got the company to cut salt, sugar and fat from some popular products like chips and soda. But critics say he did more harm than good.
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Jan 17, 2013 — Influenza is especially intense this year, and people are flooding into hospitals and doctors' offices. But the flu is just one of a triple whammy of respiratory viruses — plus the nasty norovirus — that are making lots of people sick.
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Jun 27, 2012 — An environmental group has issued its annual report on the nation's filthiest beaches, where a day in the water can mean skin rashes, stomach flu and respiratory problems. Who made the list?
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