Latest News from NPR

on:

NCPR is supported by:

 
Hourly Newscast
4 min., 45 sec.

Programs

Latest program rundown

Coming up:

Latest Features:
APA/Landov
July 31, 2014 | NPR · Tens of thousands of displaced Gazans face skyrocketing prices for limited water supplies, and severely disrupted electricity service. As well, long lines are developing for staples like bread.
 
July 31, 2014 | NPR · Christian Science Monitor reporter Christa Case Bryant tells Renee Montagne why the Israeli army is finding Hamas a more formidable foe now than during the 2009 war.
 
July 31, 2014 | NPR · Oklahoma is experiencing more earthquakes, and some scientists say they're caused by wastewater disposal wells. Linda Wertheimer learns more from energy reporter Joe Wertz of StateImpact Oklahoma.
 

Latest program rundown

Coming up:

Latest Features:
July 31, 2014 | NPR · The day began with Israel's military calling up 16,000 more reservists, stoking fears of a widening offensive in Gaza; it ended with a 72-hour cease-fire agreement between Israel and Hamas.
 
July 31, 2014 | NPR · Nearly a month into the war in Gaza, pollsters have been taking a look at how attitudes in the region have changed among Israelis and Palestinians.
 
July 31, 2014 | NPR · A surge of new cases in West Africa's Ebola virus outbreak has health officials worried that the epidemic is getting worse. Sierra Leone, for one, has declared a state of emergency, sending in troops to quarantine some of the hardest hit communities.
 

Latest Saturday rundown




WE Saturday Feature

July 26, 2014 | NPR · Hezbollah has been a longtime ally of Hamas, but during this most recent conflict between Israel and Gaza they've taken a sideline role. NPR's Scott Simon talks to the BBC's Kim Ghattas in Beirut.
 

Latest Sunday rundown


WE Sunday Feature

July 27, 2014 | NPR · Fighting in Ukraine near the crash site of Malaysia Airlines Flight MH17 has international investigators staying away. NPR's Arun Rath talks with OSCE's Michael Bociurkiw about the investigation.
 

Latest program rundown

Coming up:

public health

Jul 19, 2014 — Gov. Andrew Cuomo is supporting the drug Truvada as part of the state's ambitious plan to fight AIDS. But some advocates worry it will encourage risky behavior or won't reach the most vulnerable.
Launch in player | Comments |
Jul 8, 2014 — Sure, we all forget stuff. But federal researchers apparently forgot vials of smallpox virus, perhaps for 60 years. The vials were rushed to a secure lab in Atlanta.
Comments |
Jun 2, 2014 — Each year, 1 percent of children are abused or neglected, usually by their parents. By the time children turn 18, about 1 in 8 of them is likely to have been maltreated, an analysis finds.
Comments |
Feb 12, 2014 — Most people who are infected with West Nile virus never get sick. But some of those who do can wind up in the hospital, or suffer permanent disability. A Texas outbreak in 2012 may have made West Nile one of the more costly diseases in the state that year.
Comments |
Sep 19, 2013 — People who show up wounded at a hospital often don't tell police. When a hospital in Cardiff, Wales, shared that information without naming names, the toll of violence dropped, and the city saved $11 million a year on health care and policing. Other British cities are adopting the program.
Comments |
Sep 16, 2013 — If obesity were a disease, would you be more likely to seek medical help because insurance would pay for treatment? Or would you feel stigmatized and just give up? That's the debate surrounding increased efforts to classify obesity as a disease.
Launch in player | Comments |
Sep 13, 2013 — For decades, DNA has been used to identify victims of crime, even victims of war crimes. But there's no international standard for using DNA analysis for identifying bodies after a disaster. So some scholars are calling for an international group with the same reach as weapons inspectors.
Launch in player | Comments |
Aug 28, 2013 — State and local public health departments are turning to apps as to help them reach people when they need help the most. Birth control finders, recipe tweakers and searchable restaurant inspections are in the mix.
Comments |
Jun 3, 2013 — Tuberculosis is much less of a health threat in the United States than it is in other countries. But a family in Boston discovered that even here, no one is immune from this ancient foe. More than a dozen family members were infected with TB, and matriarch Judy Williams died at age 59.
Launch in player | Comments |
Mar 5, 2013 — People don't mind new laws telling them how to eat, as long as they feel like they're not being coerced. That's the finding of a new study from the Harvard School of Public Health, which took the unusual step of asking people what they thought about government efforts to encourage healthy eating.
Comments |
more public health from NPR