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April 23, 2014 | NPR · They say they were placed on the list for refusing to inform on other Muslims. The suit is part of a broad wave of cases challenging the secretive no-fly list and U.S. counterterrorism strategies.
 
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April 23, 2014 | NPR · Activists say a federal law that allows employers to pay people with disabilities pennies per hour is out of date and should be changed. But some say the law is a lifeline for the disabled.
 
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April 23, 2014 | NPR · Shakespeare's Globe Theater aims to take the Bard's iconic play to every country in the world. They'll perform everywhere from prestigious theaters to Pacific island beaches.
 

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April 22, 2014 | NPR · Washington Gov. Jay Inslee offers an update on the deadly mudslides near the town of Oso in March. President Obama is visiting Oso on Tuesday.
 
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April 22, 2014 | NPR · The Army plans to take all Apache attack helicopters from the National Guard. The Guard says that's an insult, but Army leaders say it's not personal — it's just about saving money.
 
April 22, 2014 | NPR · The White House named Neil Eggleston its new top lawyer. He'll have to muster his legal and political skills to deal with a divided Congress and multiple investigations of the Obama's administration.
 

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April 19, 2014 | NPR · The search continues for hundreds of people, mostly students, who were on board a South Korean ferry when it sank this week. Correspondent Anthony Kuhn shares the latest with NPR's Wade Goodwyn.
 

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April 20, 2014 | NPR · Monday is the 2014 Boston Marathon. Security will be tight, and this year's race will be an emotional event that will be about more than who wins.
 

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public health

Feb 12, 2014 — Most people who are infected with West Nile virus never get sick. But some of those who do can wind up in the hospital, or suffer permanent disability. A Texas outbreak in 2012 may have made West Nile one of the more costly diseases in the state that year.
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Sep 19, 2013 — People who show up wounded at a hospital often don't tell police. When a hospital in Cardiff, Wales, shared that information without naming names, the toll of violence dropped, and the city saved $11 million a year on health care and policing. Other British cities are adopting the program.
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Sep 16, 2013 — If obesity were a disease, would you be more likely to seek medical help because insurance would pay for treatment? Or would you feel stigmatized and just give up? That's the debate surrounding increased efforts to classify obesity as a disease.
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Sep 13, 2013 — For decades, DNA has been used to identify victims of crime, even victims of war crimes. But there's no international standard for using DNA analysis for identifying bodies after a disaster. So some scholars are calling for an international group with the same reach as weapons inspectors.
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Aug 28, 2013 — State and local public health departments are turning to apps as to help them reach people when they need help the most. Birth control finders, recipe tweakers and searchable restaurant inspections are in the mix.
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Jun 3, 2013 — Tuberculosis is much less of a health threat in the United States than it is in other countries. But a family in Boston discovered that even here, no one is immune from this ancient foe. More than a dozen family members were infected with TB, and matriarch Judy Williams died at age 59.
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Mar 5, 2013 — People don't mind new laws telling them how to eat, as long as they feel like they're not being coerced. That's the finding of a new study from the Harvard School of Public Health, which took the unusual step of asking people what they thought about government efforts to encourage healthy eating.
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Jan 28, 2013 — Public health expert Derek Yach surprised nutrition advocates when he joined PepsiCo six years ago. He got the company to cut salt, sugar and fat from some popular products like chips and soda. But critics say he did more harm than good.
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Jan 17, 2013 — Influenza is especially intense this year, and people are flooding into hospitals and doctors' offices. But the flu is just one of a triple whammy of respiratory viruses — plus the nasty norovirus — that are making lots of people sick.
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Jun 27, 2012 — An environmental group has issued its annual report on the nation's filthiest beaches, where a day in the water can mean skin rashes, stomach flu and respiratory problems. Who made the list?
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