Latest News from NPR

on:

NCPR is supported by:

 
Hourly Newscast
4 min., 45 sec.

Programs

Latest program rundown

Coming up:

Latest Features:
September 1, 2014 | NPR · A Guinean student in the Senegalese capital of Dakar has tested positive for the deadly disease. David Greene talks to Krista Larson, West Africa correspondent for the Associated Press.
 
September 1, 2014 | NPR · Protesters surrounded Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif's home, and for a brief period forced government TV off the air. Steve Inskeep talks to Jon Boone, a correspondent for The Guardian in Islamabad.
 
YouTube
September 1, 2014 | NPR · A widely-watched video shows a foreigner fainting on a subway car and everyone around him fleeing. No one helps. It's sparked a national debate about trust, fear and the Chinese national character.
 

Latest program rundown

Coming up:

Latest Features:
August 31, 2014 | NPR · On Sunday, Iraqi and Kurdish forces broke a nearly 80-day siege by the Islamic State on the town of Amerli, where residents now have enough food and water for the first time in weeks.
 
August 31, 2014 | NPR · The U.S. military's attention to PTSD is well-documented but Kurdish fighters living with the same disorder haven't received nearly as much care. Arun Rath talks to journalist Jenna Krajeski.
 
August 31, 2014 | NPR · Arun Rath talks to journalist Shane Harris about his Foreign Policy story on "Lady al-Qaida," Aafia Siddiqui. The Pakistani-born woman was arrested in Afghanistan in 2008.
 

Latest Saturday rundown




WE Saturday Feature

August 30, 2014 | NPR · Ukrainian forces are defending the port city of Novoazovsk from what they say is a Russian invasion. Scott Simon talks to correspondent Soraya Sarhaddi Nelson.
 

Latest Sunday rundown


WE Sunday Feature

August 31, 2014 | NPR · Immigration remains one of the most challenging issues for President Obama. Political correspondent Mara Liasson discusses the political cost of the choices before him with Linda Wertheimer.
 

Latest program rundown

Coming up:

Global Health

Aug 11, 2011 — Grandmothers in this West African nation have traditionally passed on health education and childbirth tips to the pregnant women. Now, health care workers are coming to communities to teach the elders modern medicine and discuss topics like breast-feeding — so there isn't conflict when the baby arrives.
Launch in player | Comments |
Aug 10, 2011 — According to a new government survey, Pakistan is producing nearly 4 million babies every year, and most are born into poverty. Conservative clerics tell Muslims that the Quran instructs women to bear as many babies as possible. But some families aren't so sure.
Launch in player | Comments |
Jul 6, 2011 — In one province of the southeastern African nation, 30 percent of women are HIV-positive. Pregnant women who seek prenatal care are routinely tested for the virus and, if infected, will be given anti-retroviral drugs to help prevent transmission to their babies. But drug shortages are preventing some women from getting the help they need.
Launch in player | Comments |
Jun 28, 2011 — The leading cause of maternal death in the developing world is excessive bleeding after childbirth. The drug misoprostol can prevent the bleeding — but it can also be used to induce abortion. So it carries both a promise and a risk, especially in places like Mozambique.
Launch in player | Comments |
Jun 27, 2011 — Mozambique's rates of maternal and infant mortality are among the highest in the world. So the government is trying to encourage women to have their babies in maternity units. It's also training volunteers to help with basic medical care and nurses to carry out procedures like cesarean sections.
Launch in player | Comments |
Oct 16, 2012 — Northern Nigeria is the only region in the world where the number of polio cases is on the rise. International groups have poured money and volunteers into the area to combat the disease. But vaccinators face daunting challenges — from security threats like terrorist bombings to a lack of basic resources like electricity.
Launch in player | Comments |
Oct 3, 2012 — In northern Nigeria, some miners use crude methods to extract raw gold ore — a practice fueled by rising gold prices. But the gold here is embedded in lead, and the dust kicked up by this dirty and illegal mining has killed hundreds of children and sickened thousands more. Experts say this may be the worst case of lead poisoning in recent history.
Launch in player | Comments |
more Global Health from NPR