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August 28, 2014 | NPR · For the first time, researchers have tracked the spread of Ebola, almost in real time, during an outbreak. The virus is quickly changing its genetic code. But it's unclear what the mutations mean.
 
August 29, 2014 | NPR · French President Francois Hollande is under pressure to fix the country's economy, which is overburdened by regulation and failing a generation of young people. He's also facing calls for austerity.
 
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August 29, 2014 | NPR · Congressman and former Republican vice presidential nominee Paul Ryan discusses his new book, The Way Forward: Renewing the American Idea.
 

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August 29, 2014 | NPR · The Obama administration is considering whether to broaden its air campaign against the extremist group the Islamic State by striking targets in Syria.
 
August 29, 2014 | NPR · Regular political commentators, E.J. Dionne of The Washington Post and David Brooks of The New York Times, discuss the latest in Ukraine and the actions of ISIS in Iraq and Syria.
 
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August 29, 2014 | NPR · An earthquake in Napa Valley this week brought back old fears for author Gustavo Arellano. In his anxiety he's revisiting the book A Crack in the Edge of the World.
 

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August 30, 2014 | NPR · Ukrainian forces are defending the port city of Novoazovsk from what they say is a Russian invasion. Scott Simon talks to correspondent Soraya Sarhaddi Nelson.
 

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August 24, 2014 | NPR · In the wake of violent clashes between protesters and police in Ferguson, Mo., President Obama is ordering a review of the federal programs that help local police departments purchase military gear.
 

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Southern States

Jun 17, 2014 — You don't need to be H.G. Wells to make these journeys — from ancient Korea to future Oxford University and outer space in the 25th century, just turn the page and you'll be there.
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May 15, 2014 — In Norman Lock's new novel, Huck and Jim set out on their raft in 1835, but are swept up and along through three wrenching centuries: slavery, the Civil War, Reconstruction, Jim Crow and onward.
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Mar 28, 2014 — In a his book, historian Bruce Levine says that from the destruction of the South emerged an entirely new country, making the Civil War equivalent to a second American Revolution.
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Dec 4, 2013 — NPR staff and critics selected more than 200 standout titles. Now it's up to you: Choose your own adventure! Use our tags to search through books and find the perfect read for yourself or someone else.
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Aug 14, 2013 — Before the nation's attention turned to the March on Washington, William Moore was making his own pilgrimage for racial equality. He intended to walk from Tennessee to Jackson, Miss., to ask the Mississippi governor to end segregation — but the Baltimore mail carrier never reached his destination.
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Aug 10, 2013The Storied South is a new book by folklorist William Ferris, collecting 40 years worth of oral histories from Southern writers and artists. Ferris tells NPR's Celeste Headlee that the book was a way of getting everyone from Eudora Welty to Bobby Rush to a "common table of conversation."
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Aug 5, 2013 — Earlier this summer, NPR's Backseat Book Club — our book club for young readers — asked you to weigh in on your favorite books for kids age 9-14. We heard from more than 2,000 of you, and our expert panel has whittled your hundreds and hundreds of nominations down to a list of 100 great reads.
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Jul 25, 2013 — Author Jean Zimmerman chooses five books that "pick up where history leaves off," shedding new light on often forgotten corners of history, from the unruly Florida frontier of the 18th century to the real-life little dancer who inspired Edgar Degas' famous sculpture.
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Jul 15, 2013 — In softcover nonfiction, Chuck Thompson makes the case for Southern secession, and Adam Winkler explores the history of the American gun control battle. In fiction, Rowling tries her hand at a novel for grown-ups.
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Jun 12, 2013 — Backwoods preachers spout Bible verses while spreading mayhem and revolution in Kent Wascom's The Blood of Heaven. The novel is set in the early 1800s, when western Florida was a battleground where Americans fought Spanish and French imperialists for control.
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