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April 18, 2014 | NPR · The agreement calls on all parties to refrain from violence, requires that illegally-armed groups disarm and that control of government buildings be returned to Ukrainian authorities.
 
April 18, 2014 | NPR · President Obama said enrollment under the Affordable Care Act reached 8 million after the deadline was extended by 2 weeks. The figure represents a turnaround from the disastrous debut of the website.
 
April 18, 2014 | NPR · Morning Edition spent a lot of time recently reporting from the U.S.-Mexico border. President Obama has deported 2 million people from the U.S. But many say that number is misleading.
 

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April 20, 2014 | NPR · California farmers produce an enormous proportion of American produce, but the state is now experiencing a record-breaking drought that is being felt throughout the state and the U.S.
 
April 20, 2014 | NPR · It's been a grim Easter Sunday in South Korea as the death toll continues to rise from the ferry disaster that left nearly 300 passengers, many of them high school students, dead or missing.
 
Courtesy of Jessica Kensky and Patrick Downes
April 20, 2014 | WBUR · Newlyweds Jessica Kensky and Patrick Downes each lost a leg in the Boston Marathon bombing. Rescue the assistance dog helps fetch keys and push buttons, bringing warmth and joy as the couple recovers.
 

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April 19, 2014 | NPR · The search continues for hundreds of people, mostly students, who were on board a South Korean ferry when it sank this week. Correspondent Anthony Kuhn shares the latest with NPR's Wade Goodwyn.
 

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April 20, 2014 | NPR · Monday is the 2014 Boston Marathon. Security will be tight, and this year's race will be an emotional event that will be about more than who wins.
 

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Social aspects

Mar 28, 2014 — In a his book, historian Bruce Levine says that from the destruction of the South emerged an entirely new country, making the Civil War equivalent to a second American Revolution.
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Feb 28, 2014 — At No. 6, The Power of Habit, explores the science behind habit-forming behavior.
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Jan 17, 2014 — Insect-eating is catching on with some in the United States. But it's everyday behavior in many other cultures. Commentator Barbara J. King wonders how meat eaters and vegetarians in the U.S. react to dishes with grasshoppers and katydids as key ingredients.
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Jan 8, 2014 — In softcover nonfiction, William Knoedelseder looks at the family behind Budweiser, Charles Duhigg delves into the science of habit, Fred Kaplan explores an Army revolution, and Whole Foods' founder argues for businesses pursuing a higher purpose. In fiction, George Saunders delivers a collection of fantastical stories.
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Dec 9, 2013 — Historian Maureen Ogle's new book examines the rise of our modern industrial meat system by examining its roots — all the way back to Colonial America. There's a fundamental disconnect, she argues, in our demands for both cheap, plentiful meat and an end to factory farms. Something, she says, has to give.
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Nov 22, 2013 — Dana Goodyear's new Anything That Moves is an eyes-(and-mouth)-wide-open trip through America's foodie subcultures, from raw food enthusiasts to underground supper clubs. Reviewer Jason Sheehan says Goodyear is a "fair guide to the underbelly," but doesn't exercise enough critical judgment when it comes to the crazier dishes.
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Nov 17, 2013 — Author Dana Goodyear has spent a lot of time dining with foodies who champion bugs as a meal. And horses. And brains. Whales. Leaves. Weeds. Ash. Hay. Even plain dirt. Her new book documents the adventurous chefs and eaters who are redefining Americans' relationship with food.
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Oct 27, 2013 — You may blame a love of Snickers for those too-tight jeans, but in the early 20th century, the accusations were more serious: Candy was blamed for moral and physical decay. In Candy: A Century of Panic and Pleasure, Samira Kawash traces our love-hate relationship with sweets.
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Oct 24, 2013 — Salvadoran journalist Oscar Martinez has ridden the train known as "the Beast" eight times, interviewing Central American migrants on their way to the U.S. He shares his experiences in the book The Beast. Alt.Latino asked him about the books he read that inspired him — and what he'd take to read on a desert island.
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Oct 13, 2013 — The Food Network was intended for cooks, but it wasn't run by them. In a new tell-all book, Allen Salkin takes an unsparing look at the channel's progression from struggling cable startup to global powerhouse, and the people who rose and fell along the way.
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