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August 22, 2014 | NPR · The standoff between the U.S. and Russia over Ukraine has raised the specter of a new Cold War. David Greene talks to Julie Ioffe, of the New Republic, about what Russia's next move may be in Ukraine.
 
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August 22, 2014 | NPR · Even just the word Ebola is kind of terrifying. Why? Hollywood has a lot to do with it. But Ebola outbreaks also have all the ingredients for what one psychologist calls the "dread factor."
 
August 22, 2014 | NPR · Census Bureau data show a wider gap between rich and poor. Kelly McEvers explores this with economist Enrico Moretti of the University of California-Berkeley, author of The New Geography of Jobs.
 

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August 21, 2014 | KWMU · The violence at night in Ferguson, Mo., has calmed down for now. However, more than 160 people have been arrested since the protests began. Police records offer a sense of who they are.
 
August 21, 2014 | NPR · The aftermath of the police shooting in Ferguson, Mo., has focused attention on police-involved killings more broadly in the U.S. But statistics on shootings by police are scarce. To learn why, Audie Cornish speaks with David Klinger, an associate professor at the University of Missouri in St. Louis.
 
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August 21, 2014 | NPR · The hunt is on to identify the man in the James Foley execution video who speaks with a British accent. An estimated 2,000 Europeans have left home to join the Islamic State in Syria and Iraq.
 

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August 16, 2014 | NPR · Both Ukraine and Russia say they're trying to send supplies to residents in eastern Ukraine. But with tensions on both sides running high, that aid may take a while to arrive.
 

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August 17, 2014 | NPR · American fighter jets and drones carried out airstrikes against Islamist targets near the Mosul Dam in northern Iraq on Saturday. A breach of the dam could threaten entire cities.
 

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Fear

Jun 5, 2014 — The NPR education team brings you 25 books with minority characters and authors.
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Oct 10, 2013 — A young baseball player who gets hit by a fastball must find the courage to step back up to the plate. Michael Northrop, the author of Plunked, is no stranger to overcoming obstacles — he's dyslexic, and he says that learning to read was a real struggle when he was a kid: "I can't read fast. I can read carefully, though."
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Jun 13, 2013 — Looking for a great read for a kid age 9-14? Here are all the titles our kids' book club has read since we launched in 2011. We revisit classics like Black Beauty and The Phantom Tollbooth and explore new stories like Diary of a Wimpy Kid and The Graveyard Book.
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Jul 13, 2011 — Dan Kois picks five hilarious new books to lift you out of the summer swelter. Go ahead: Laugh, giggle or guffaw until you sweat!
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May 16, 2011 — In The Man in the Gray Flannel Skirt, Jon-Jon Goulian offers a witty and engaging — if not particularly insightful — reflection on his transformation from shy child to outrageous Manhattan scenester.
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Mar 23, 2011 — Jennifer Egan paints an inventive portrait of a record executive and his employee, while Anna Quindlen plumbs the life of a suburban mother. Mitch Albom tells the story of two clergymen, Carol Burnett remembers her TV variety show, and Marion Meade looks at the wacky life of writer Nathanael West.
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Apr 21, 2010 — The best-selling author explores her darker side in Every Last One, a tale about a mother whose ordinary suburban life is shattered when her family is violently traumatized by a trusted friend.
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May 25, 2007 — In a new book, Al Gore takes a harsh look at the media's fascination with flash over substance and a lack of courage among politicians of both parties.
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Oct 25, 2004 — The so-called "politics of fear" has become a mainstay on every presidential campaign stop. NPR's Tavis Smiley talks about the use of fear in the present and past campaigns with Clarence Lusane of American University's School of International Service, and Corey Robin, author of Fear: The History of a Political Idea.
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