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July 9, 2014 | NPR · Several red states, including Louisiana, have been diverting some offenders away from prison and into drug treatment and other incarceration alternatives. But not everyone is embracing the effort.
 
July 9, 2014 | NPR · A white California Highway Patrol officer has been caught on video beating a homeless African-American woman on the side of a Los Angeles freeway. The highway patrol has started an investigation.
 
July 9, 2014 | NPR · A flood of children from Central America has put President Obama under pressure. Steve Inskeep talks to White House advisor Cecilia Muñoz about efforts to more quickly process them.
 

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July 9, 2014 | NPR · In a state that hosts one of the nation's closest Senate races, the president spoke about the women's issues that could turn the election. But Sen. Mark Udall opted not to appear alongside Obama.
 
July 9, 2014 | NPR · After two decades of lobbying for the Employment Non-Discrimination Act, the National Gay and Lesbian Task Force has decided to withdraw its support for the bill. In the wake of the Supreme Court's Hobby Lobby decision, the group fears that the ENDA's broad religious exemption would allow companies to discriminate against employees for their sexual orientation or gender identity. Melissa Block speaks with the group's executive director, Rae Carey, about the move.
 
July 9, 2014 | NPR · U.S.-German relations were further strained Wednesday over reports that prosecutors in Germany are investigating a German soldier accused of spying for the U.S. It's the second such case in a week.
 

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July 5, 2014 | NPR · In the year since Egyptian President Mohammed Morsi was ousted, a military man was elected president and a budding insurgency has grown, as correspondent Leila Fadel tells NPR's Tamara Keith.
 

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July 6, 2014 | NPR · Tensions are high following the murder of three young Israelis and a Palestinian teen. Relatives of the murdered Palestinian say his American cousin was beaten by Israeli police during a protest.
 

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Feminists

Nov 18, 2013 — Lessing's 1962 book was regarded as among the most important feminist novels of its time. She died Sunday. Fresh Air's Terry Gross interviewed Lessing in 1988 and 1992.
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Nov 17, 2013 — Author Doris Lessing died Sunday at the age of 94. Lessing won the 2007 Nobel Prize for literature for a life's work which included around 40 books and collections of essays and memoirs. Her book, The Golden Notebook, has been called the first feminist novel — a characterization Lessing rejected as "stupid."
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Nov 17, 2013 — Lessing's 1962 novel, The Golden Notebook, is considered one of the great works of the 20th Century. It's been called by many the first feminist novel, a distinction Lessing always rejected.
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Jul 13, 2011 — Elizabeth Cady Stanton is known for helping to launch the American women's rights movement, but she sometimes also got in the way of that cause. Historian Lori Ginzberg says Stanton often prioritized white, middle-class women over others — and that has had a lasting effect.
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May 18, 2011 — Jeannette Rankin, the first female member of Congress, was elected to Congress even before all women in the country had the right to vote. She only served two terms — which were decades apart. But it was during those short spans that she was able to take a historic stand.
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Oct 11, 2007 — Best known for her 1962 novel The Golden Notebook, Lessing's life work spans more than a half century. The British author is the 11th woman and the oldest writer to win the Nobel literature award.
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Aug 28, 2005 — Jacki Lyden talks with biographer Lyndall Gordon about the life of Mary Wollstonecraft, the 18th-century feminist and author of A Vindication of the Rights of Women. Gordon describes Wollstonecraft's violent upbringing, her radical views on education, and her failed love affair.
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