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September 1, 2014 | NPR · A Guinean student in the Senegalese capital of Dakar has tested positive for the deadly disease. David Greene talks to Krista Larson, West Africa correspondent for the Associated Press.
 
September 1, 2014 | NPR · Protesters surrounded Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif's home, and for a brief period forced government TV off the air. Steve Inskeep talks to Jon Boone, a correspondent for The Guardian in Islamabad.
 
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September 1, 2014 | NPR · A widely watched video shows a foreigner fainting on a subway car and everyone around him fleeing. No one helps. It's rekindled a national debate about trust, fear and the Chinese national character.
 

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September 1, 2014 | NPR · Ebola has exposed weaknesses in Africa's health networks and a failure to work together to arrest the spread of the virus. The "not our problem" response is taking an economic toll on the continent.
 
September 1, 2014 | NPR · Nearly 260 health workers in West Africa have been infected, and 134 have died. Dr. Robert Garry of Tulane University, who worked with five who died, discusses the devastation in the community.
 
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September 1, 2014 | NPR · Ads with candidates shooting guns are proliferating this year. It can all be traced back to Sen. Joe Manchin's famed 2010 spot "Dead Aim."
 

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August 30, 2014 | NPR · Ukrainian forces are defending the port city of Novoazovsk from what they say is a Russian invasion. Scott Simon talks to correspondent Soraya Sarhaddi Nelson.
 

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August 31, 2014 | NPR · Immigration remains one of the most challenging issues for President Obama. Political correspondent Mara Liasson discusses the political cost of the choices before him with Linda Wertheimer.
 

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Women's rights

Apr 12, 2013 — In softcover nonfiction, Fawzia Koofi reflects on her hard-won empowerment in Afghanistan, Gustavo Arellano surveys America's obsession with Mexican cuisine and Craig Havighurst documents the rich history of Nashville country radio.
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Nov 19, 2012 — Novelist Richard Mason explores belle epoque pleasures, biographer Jean Baker champions sex educator Margaret Sanger, journalist A.J. Jacobs gets healthy, comedian Bill Cosby outsmarts his grandkids, and writer Geoff Dyer takes on filmmaker Andrei Tarkovsky.
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Feb 22, 2012 — Fawzia Koofi almost died on the day she was born, but survived against all odds and became the first female deputy speaker of Afghanistan's parliament. Koofi plans to run for president in two years, and in a new memoir, describes her hopes for the country's future.
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Jul 13, 2011 — Elizabeth Cady Stanton is known for helping to launch the American women's rights movement, but she sometimes also got in the way of that cause. Historian Lori Ginzberg says Stanton often prioritized white, middle-class women over others — and that has had a lasting effect.
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Aug 14, 2010 — Eunice Chapman won the first legal divorce in New York State in 1818. Her scandalous case pitted Mrs. Chapman against her abusive husband, who took their three children and joined the radical Shaker sect. NPR's Guy Raz talks to Ilyon Woo, author of a new book about the case, called The Great Divorce.
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Apr 27, 2010 — Some Muslims hope to create political, economic and educational opportunities for women, while others condemn women's empowerment as anti-Islamic. A new brand of feminism is taking hold in the Middle East and beyond. It's led, more often than not, by women.
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Oct 27, 2009 — Three days after Malalai Joya was born in Afghanistan, the government was overthrown. In A Woman Among Warlords, Joya tells the story of her family's struggle against Islamic fundamentalists, warlords and foreign occupation.
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May 13, 2008 — In her book Unveiled, Deborah Kanafani recounts her marriage and divorce to a high-ranking Palestinian diplomat — and the cultural rift between her "American" upbringing and her married life.
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Jun 27, 2007 — Muslim feminist Asra Nomani, a former Wall Street Journal reporter, recently spent a fellowship covering a Muslim woman who was building a women's mosque in India. Nomani's new book is called Standing Alone in Mecca: An American Woman's Struggle for the Soul of Islam.
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May 4, 2006 — In her new collection of essays, Dutch parliamentarian Ayaan Hirsi Ali, a native of Somalia, calls on her fellow Muslims to change their attitudes about the role of women in the world's fastest-growing religion.
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