Latest News from NPR

on:

NCPR is supported by:

 
Hourly Newscast
4 min., 45 sec.

Programs

Latest program rundown

Coming up:

Latest Features:
July 25, 2014 | NPR · Steve Inskeep talks with Honduran Foreign Minister Mireya Aguero de Corrales, who's in Washington to help find a solution to the thousands of Central American children arriving at the U.S. border.
 
July 25, 2014 | NPR · Massachusetts is offering to house hundreds of unaccompanied minors who've been detained crossing the U.S.-Mexico border. One of the proposed sites is on Cape Cod, but residents are blasting the plan.
 
July 25, 2014 | NPR · The novels of John le Carre have been reliable sources of compelling cinema. The new adaptation of "A Most Wanted Man" stars Philip Seymour Hoffman in one of his last roles.
 

Latest program rundown

Coming up:

Latest Features:
July 24, 2014 | NPR · A United Nations school, which was being used to shelter displaced Gazans awaiting evacuation, came under fire from a missile or shelling. The attack reportedly killed 15 people. Palestinian officials blame Israeli shelling; Israel says it may have been Hamas rockets that fell short of their target.
 
July 24, 2014 | NPR · The war in Gaza is unfolding between Israel and Hamas, but the Palestinian Authority, based in the West Bank, is also involved in efforts to end the fighting. The Palestine Liberation Organization's diplomatic representative to the U.S., Maen Areikat, speaks with Robert Siegel about the causes of the conflict and the possible consequences of a cease-fire.
 
Getty Images
July 24, 2014 | NPR · If no contract deal is reached by July 31, Metropolitan Opera General Manager Peter Gelb has warned union workers to plan for a work stoppage the next day.
 

Latest Saturday rundown




WE Saturday Feature

July 19, 2014 | NPR · NPR's Scott Simon talks with David Herzsenhorn of The New York Times about the latest developments in Ukraine, where a Malaysia Airlines passenger plane was downed on Thursday, killing 298 people.
 

Latest Sunday rundown


WE Sunday Feature

July 20, 2014 | NPR · NPR's Arun Rath gets the latest from correspondent Corey Flintoff at the site of last week's downing of a Malaysian jetliner in Eastern Ukraine.
 

Latest program rundown

Coming up:

Health

Nov 25, 2013 — In The Man He Became, historian James Tobin says, despite misimpressions to the contrary, Americans of Franklin Roosevelt's day were well-aware of his disability — it was an important part of the personal narrative that helped him win the presidency.
Launch in player | Comments |
Aug 16, 2013 — In Brain on Fire, appearing at No. 9, Susannah Cahalan looks back on her battle with a rare disease.
Comments |
Aug 5, 2013 — In softcover nonfiction, David Randall examines the science of sleep, and Susannah Cahalan falls prey to a mysterious disease. In fiction, Claire Vaye Watkins explores the American West, and Ivan Doig looks at a single dad whose world is upended.
Comments |
Aug 2, 2013 — Yes, they're slimy and squishy and move on their own mucus, but here's a little secret about snails: They have teeth. Lots and lots and lots of teeth. The snail in our story had 2,640 of them, until they fell out. But not to worry. They grow back.
Comments |
Feb 18, 2013 — It was one of the most revolutionary tools of biomedical research: the immortal HeLa cell line. But few people know the cells belonged to a poor Southern tobacco farmer named Henrietta Lacks. Rebecca Skloot spent years researching Lacks and tells her story in The Immortal Life Of Henrietta Lacks.
Launch in player | Comments |
Feb 15, 2013 — Al Roker won fame as the ever-smiling weatherman on NBC's Today show. But he also endured years of indignities because of his weight. That was until he had bariatric surgery, and lost more than 100 pounds. During this encore presentation, Roker talks with host Michel Martin about his experiences, and his latest book, Never Goin' Back.
Launch in player | Comments |
Jan 28, 2013 — Roker won fame as the ever-smiling weatherman on NBC's Today show. But he also endured years of indignities because of his weight. Then, in 2001, he had bariatric surgery and lost more than 100 pounds. Roker speaks with NPR's Michel Martin about his experiences and his latest book, Never Goin' Back.
Launch in player | Comments |
Dec 3, 2012 — This year's treasures include a heart-racing memoir, a fun first novel, a fascinating study of fraternal bonds, plus Toni Morrison's Home and Christopher Hitchens' last work. Critic Heller McAlpin has sifted through piles of new publications and panned for literary gold.
Comments |
Nov 19, 2012 — Novelist Richard Mason explores belle epoque pleasures, biographer Jean Baker champions sex educator Margaret Sanger, journalist A.J. Jacobs gets healthy, comedian Bill Cosby outsmarts his grandkids, and writer Geoff Dyer takes on filmmaker Andrei Tarkovsky.
Comments |
Nov 13, 2012 — The world's first essayist, Michel Montaigne, was out riding one day when he got slammed from the rear, was thrown from his horse, crashed to the ground and for a brief time was, as he puts it, "dead." He described exactly what it felt like. Here's what he learned.
Comments |
more Health from NPR