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July 25, 2014 | NPR · Steve Inskeep talks with Honduran Foreign Minister Mireya Aguero de Corrales, who's in Washington to help find a solution to the thousands of Central American children arriving at the U.S. border.
 
July 25, 2014 | WBUR · Massachusetts is offering to house hundreds of unaccompanied minors who've been detained crossing the U.S.-Mexico border. One of the proposed sites is on Cape Cod, but residents are blasting the plan.
 
July 25, 2014 | NPR · The novels of John le Carre have been reliable sources of compelling cinema. The new adaptation of "A Most Wanted Man" stars Philip Seymour Hoffman in one of his last roles.
 

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July 27, 2014 | NPR · Israel and Hamas carried out a rhetorical battle Sunday over the fate of dueling offers to extend a ceasefire. In the end, the fighting resumed after Saturday's 12-hour truce. Israel vowed to continue its military campaign, targeting tunnels along the border. Wary Gazans prepared as best they could for the feast that marks the end of Ramadan.
 
July 27, 2014 | NPR · Anne Barnard from The New York Times talks with NPR's Eric Westervelt about the differences between the current explosion of violence in Gaza and previous ones.
 
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July 27, 2014 | NPR · The Harrier Jump Jet is known for vertical take-offs and landings. It also has an accident-prone track record, but that didn't dissuade one pilot from buying his dream plane.
 

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July 26, 2014 | NPR · Hezbollah has been a longtime ally of Hamas, but during this most recent conflict between Israel and Gaza they've taken a sideline role. NPR's Scott Simon talks to the BBC's Kim Ghattas in Beirut.
 

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July 27, 2014 | NPR · Fighting in Ukraine near the crash site of Malaysia Airlines Flight MH17 has international investigators staying away. NPR's Arun Rath talks with OSCE's Michael Bociurkiw about the investigation.
 

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Physiology

Aug 2, 2013 — Yes, they're slimy and squishy and move on their own mucus, but here's a little secret about snails: They have teeth. Lots and lots and lots of teeth. The snail in our story had 2,640 of them, until they fell out. But not to worry. They grow back.
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Feb 29, 2012 — Our brains are filled with billions of neurons. Neuroscientist Sebastian Seung explains how mapping out the connections between those neurons might be the key to understanding the basis of things like personality, memory, perception, ideas and mental illness.
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Jul 14, 2011 — Neuroscientist Dean Buonomano explains why our brains make mistakes when we try to remember long lists of information or add large numbers in our heads. Humans live "in a time and place we didn't evolve to live in," he says.
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Feb 14, 2011 — Neurologist V.S. Ramachandran, a pioneer in the field of visual perception, explains how his simple experiments in behavioral neurology have changed the lives of patients suffering from a variety of neurological symptoms in The Tell-Tale Brain.
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Dec 10, 2010 — It's that time of year again! Susan Stamberg chats with three independent booksellers about their favorite reads of the year, from an atlas of remote islands to a children's book about feminist heroes.
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Aug 28, 2010 — Struggling with an illness that left her bedridden, Elisabeth Tova Bailey was surprised when her friend brought her a gift: a pot of flowers that also contained a wild snail. In a new memoir, Bailey describes how that nearly motionless mollusk became an unlikely companion.
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Jul 14, 2010 — You don't need a background in science to enjoy these research-fueled reads. From the mysteries of the male brain to the logistics of having a clone to the problem of mortality, these books straightforwardly tackle present and future scientific puzzles.
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Jun 2, 2010 — After performing Albert Einstein's autopsy, the pathologist put the brain in a jar of formaldehyde and made off with it. That single act torpedoed his reputation, but years later it helped researchers learn more about how our minds work. It turns out that Einstein's brain had more of certain key cells, which were previously thought to be unimportant.
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Feb 12, 2008 — She may be a former Miss Virginia, but beauty queen-turned-author Nancy Amanda Redd is on a mission to help young women deal with their body issues. She wrote a new advice book titled Body Drama.
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