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August 20, 2014 | NPR · If you venture away from the protest zone in Ferguson, Mo., there is an idyllic neighborhood, which doesn't have much patience for the out-of-towners who have joined the protests.
 
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August 20, 2014 | NPR · President Obama's carefully avoided taking sides following the shooting of Missouri teen Michael Brown, disappointing some African-American observers.
 
August 20, 2014 | NPR · Texas ranks 49th out of 50 states in how much funding it commits to mental health. But San Antonio has become a model for other mental health systems. It has saved $50 million over the past 5 years.
 

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August 19, 2014 | NPR · Dr. Joanne Liu of Doctors Without Borders says fear and a lack of sense of urgency has kept the international community in their home countries rather than stepping up to the plate in West Africa.
 
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August 19, 2014 | NPR · The type of Ebola erupting in West Africa is closely related to one found 2,500 miles away — the distance between Boston and San Francisco. How did the virus spread so far without anyone noticing?
 
August 19, 2014 | NPR · Iranian poet and women's rights advocate Simin Behbahani has died. Her work probed the social and political challenges that faced Iran after its Islamic Revolution. She was 87.
 

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August 16, 2014 | NPR · Both Ukraine and Russia say they're trying to send supplies to residents in eastern Ukraine. But with tensions on both sides running high, that aid may take a while to arrive.
 

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August 17, 2014 | NPR · American fighter jets and drones carried out airstrikes against Islamist targets near the Mosul Dam in northern Iraq on Saturday. A breach of the dam could threaten entire cities.
 

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East and West

Jun 18, 2013 — Is it really possible that the civilizations that grew up in the "other" hemisphere have nothing useful to say about value, the categories of experience or the nature of mind? No. Luckily, we may be on the cusp of a new global era for philosophy.
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May 2, 2012 — Next week, Dan Brown's The Lost Symbol finally arrives in paperback, along with Oscar-winning actress Diane Keaton's memoir, journalist Fareed Zakaria's update on the post-American world, journalist Annie Jacobsen's look inside a top secret U.S. military base, and journalist Mitchell Zuckoff's true tale of the survivors in a WWII plane crash.
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Jan 26, 2012Battle Hymn Of The Tiger Mother, a controversial meditation on Chinese parenting, debuts at No. 15.
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Dec 28, 2011 — Just in time for New Year's reading, Stewart O'Nan returns with a captivating look at the life of a widow, while Deborah Harkness offers a tale of magical mayhem unleashed by a manuscript at Oxford. In nonfiction, Karen Armstrong invites readers to deepen their compassion and Amy Chua offers a call to arms for "Tiger Mothers."
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Jun 30, 2011 — America's dominance on the world stage is fading, says commentator and CNN host Fareed Zakaria. He explains why the U.S. is now lagging behind other countries on key indices such as patent creation and job growth — and what that could mean for America's economic future.
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Apr 1, 2011 — Post-modern writer David Mitchell pulls off an old-fashioned yet action-packed tale in his fifth novel, The Thousand Autumns Of Jacob de Zoet. The story follows Jacob, a bookkeeper at an outpost of the Dutch East Indies Company, as he falls for a local midwife in early 19th century Japan.
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Mar 16, 2011 — Critical darling David Mitchell serves up a screwball tale in a Dutch outpost off Japan in 1799, Sam Lipsyte brings his effortless humor to campus, and China Mieville recounts an epic "squidnapping." Desmond Tutu reflects on forgiveness, and translator Edith Grossman tells of channeling Cervantes.
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Jan 11, 2011 — Amy Chua, a professor of law at Yale, has written her first memoir about raising children the "Chinese way" — with strict rules and expectations. Maureen Corrigan predicts the book will be "a book club and parenting blog phenomenon."
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Dec 9, 2010Fresh Air's resident book critic selects her favorite reads from the year, including Patti Smith's moving memoir, a feminist slant on election season and a new history of labor unions.
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Aug 21, 2010The Thousand Autumns of Jacob de Zoet is a complex, historical novel set on a Dutch trading post in late 18th century Japan. Author David Mitchell explains the extensive research that went into re-creating a bygone era.
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