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July 29, 2014 | NPR · House and Senate negotiators reached a compromise, $17 billion agreement to improve medical care for veterans. The deal comes in the final week before Congress leaves town for a monthlong recess.
 
July 29, 2014 | NPR · Washington Post reporter Liz Sly tells Renee Montagne that U.S. arms may be flowing to moderate Syrian rebels, but the aid seems to be too little too late to affect the course of the civil war.
 
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July 28, 2014 | NPR · The militant group threatens to kill parents who immunize their children. As a result, polio has come roaring back in Pakistan. Eradication now hinges on whether the country can control the virus.
 

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July 28, 2014 | NPR · A new salvo has been fired in the fight over teacher tenure. A group led by former TV anchor Campbell Brown filed a complaint in New York state court, arguing that tenure laws are preventing the state from providing every child with the "sound, basic education" its constitution guarantees.
 
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July 28, 2014 | NPR · Why are so many low-income and minority kids getting second-class educations in the U.S.? That question is at the center of the heated debate about tenure protections and who gets them.
 
July 28, 2014 | NPR · Only one movie in July, Transformers: Age of Extinction, has broken the 100 million mark during its opening weekend. Box office receipts all summer have proven anemic. Paul Dergarabedian, a senior media analyst with RENTRAK, talks to Audie Cornish about the box office slump.
 

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July 26, 2014 | NPR · Hezbollah has been a longtime ally of Hamas, but during this most recent conflict between Israel and Gaza they've taken a sideline role. NPR's Scott Simon talks to the BBC's Kim Ghattas in Beirut.
 

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July 27, 2014 | NPR · Fighting in Ukraine near the crash site of Malaysia Airlines Flight MH17 has international investigators staying away. NPR's Arun Rath talks with OSCE's Michael Bociurkiw about the investigation.
 

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Globalization

Feb 8, 2013 — Al Gore's The Future describes the six forces that are shaping our world. It debuts at No. 5.
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May 2, 2012 — Next week, Dan Brown's The Lost Symbol finally arrives in paperback, along with Oscar-winning actress Diane Keaton's memoir, journalist Fareed Zakaria's update on the post-American world, journalist Annie Jacobsen's look inside a top secret U.S. military base, and journalist Mitchell Zuckoff's true tale of the survivors in a WWII plane crash.
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Sep 20, 2011 — In his new book, the Pulitzer Prize-winning author and energy expert looks at how the need for energy is shaping the world. He joins NPR's David Greene to discuss the global implications of natural gas production in the U.S.
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Jun 30, 2011 — America's dominance on the world stage is fading, says commentator and CNN host Fareed Zakaria. He explains why the U.S. is now lagging behind other countries on key indices such as patent creation and job growth — and what that could mean for America's economic future.
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May 18, 2011 — Much talked-about novels arrive this week: Emma Donoghue's Room, about a captive mother and child, Justin Cronin's apocalyptic vampire novel The Passage, and Brady Udall's The Lonely Polygamist. In nonfiction, there's Sebastian Junger's War in Afghanistan, and Robert McCrum explains how English become the world's common tongue.
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Apr 28, 2011 — In fiction, John le Carre takes a cold look at the Russian mafia state, while Isabel Allende and Andrea Levy explore the contradictions of slavery, and Katherine Stockett probes 1960s Southern racial politics. In nonfiction, Ethan Watters decries the export of U.S. mental health treatments.
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Jun 4, 2010 — English rose from humble beginnings to become a language that's spoken by people from every corner of the Earth. In Globish, Robert McCrum tells the story of how a mongrel language slowly took the world by storm.
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Feb 22, 2010 — A book by the chairman of HSBC proposes a "new capitalism" that brings good business and good ethics together. In an NPR interview, Green, who is also an ordained priest in the Church of England, says moral and spiritual values should take precedence over immediate profit for the world's major banks.
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Jan 12, 2010 — Author Ethan Watters thinks that America is "homogenizing the way the world goes mad." In Crazy Like Us, he describes how America's approach to mental illness has spread to other cultures around the world, in a "globalization of the American psyche."
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Nov 15, 2009 — British author Martin Jacques witnessed the decline of the British Empire over his lifetime. He predicts that Americans will have a similar experience as the power of the United States declines in the coming years, yielding to an ever more powerful China. He discusses his new book, When China Rules the World.
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