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July 28, 2014 | NPR · Argentina says it cannot pay certain debts and will fall into default by July 31 if it can't come to an agreement with creditors. This would be Argentina's second default in 13 years.
 
July 28, 2014 | NPR · Even though Spain's economy is out of recession, youth unemployment has hit 57.7 percent. Economists say it could be years before jobs return. By then, many will have missed a decade or more of work.
 
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July 28, 2014 | NPR · To withstand their 9,300-mile migration, red knots feast on eggs from horseshoe crabs each spring in Delaware Bay. Scientists worry many crabs are starting to lay eggs before the birds can get there.
 

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July 28, 2014 | NPR · A new salvo has been fired in the fight over teacher tenure. A group led by former TV anchor Campbell Brown filed a complaint in New York state court, arguing that tenure laws are preventing the state from providing every child with the "sound, basic education" its constitution guarantees.
 
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July 28, 2014 | NPR · Why are so many low-income and minority kids getting second-class educations in the U.S.? That question is at the center of the heated debate about tenure protections and who gets them.
 
July 28, 2014 | NPR · Only one movie in July, Transformers: Age of Extinction, has broken the 100 million mark during its opening weekend. Box office receipts all summer have proven anemic. Paul Dergarabedian, a senior media analyst with RENTRAK, talks to Audie Cornish about the box office slump.
 

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July 26, 2014 | NPR · Hezbollah has been a longtime ally of Hamas, but during this most recent conflict between Israel and Gaza they've taken a sideline role. NPR's Scott Simon talks to the BBC's Kim Ghattas in Beirut.
 

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July 27, 2014 | NPR · Fighting in Ukraine near the crash site of Malaysia Airlines Flight MH17 has international investigators staying away. NPR's Arun Rath talks with OSCE's Michael Bociurkiw about the investigation.
 

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Short stories

Jan 14, 2014 — In softcover nonfiction, Vali Nasr analyzes foreign policy, Kathryn Miles details the fate of a ship fleeing famine and Kurt Vonnegut's letters reveal a man both hilarious and haunted. In fiction, Rachel Kushner plunges into the world of Italian radicals, Jamie Quatro crafts surreal tales and Alejandro Zambra weaves a Chilean meta-narrative.
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Jan 3, 2014 — Junot Diaz chronicles the philandering adventures of Yunior in This Is How You Lose Her, at No. 14.
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Dec 27, 2013Dear Life, a collection by Nobel laureate Alice Munro, stays at No. 1 for the 10th straight week.
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Dec 20, 2013 — In time for winter celebrations, David Sedaris' essay collection Holidays on Ice rises to No. 12.
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Dec 4, 2013 — NPR staff and critics selected more than 200 standout titles. Now it's up to you: Choose your own adventure! Use our tags to search through books and find the perfect read for yourself or someone else.
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Oct 10, 2013 — Munro's short-story collections include Dance of the Happy Shades, The Moons of Jupiter and, most recently, Dear Life. The author, who has been writing for more than 60 years, is only the 13th woman to win the prize.
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Sep 21, 2013 — As a child, author Koren Zailckas was an introvert with numbed emotions. When her fourth-grade teacher, "Mr. Cool," assigned the works of Edgar Allan Poe, she was horrified. Murder? Torture? How inappropriate! But the terrifying stories and poems transformed her: she says they scared her into life.
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Sep 13, 2013 — Junot Diaz's This Is How You Lose Her, featuring a chronically unfaithful lover, appears at No. 8.
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Sep 9, 2013 — In softcover nonfiction, Walter Isaacson records Steve Jobs' official biography, Salman Rushdie remembers hiding for his life and Lynn Povich describes a revolution at Newsweek. In fiction, Michael Chabon tells the story of a struggling California record store and Junot Diaz explores infidelity.
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Jul 21, 2013 — Author Kevin Maher laughed off the Dubliners as a 12-year old, yet one line stayed with him. It was that line that convinced him to go back to the stories, discovering a love of James Joyce in the process.
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